18 lets imagine a real life population not hwe of

This preview shows page 6 - 8 out of 11 pages.

18. Let’s imagine a real life population (not HWE) of 20,000 in a country called Panem. This population is sub-divided into 13 districts of 1000 individuals in each district, with the remaining individuals forming the population of the Capital. There is no migration between districts, nor between the Capital and any district. We sequence the genomes of everyone in Panem at its formation, and come back and sequence everyone after 100 generations. Which statements are true about our expectations for frequency of an allele, A 1 , that does not affect phenotype? (1) We expect that the A 1 allele will be fixed in some districts and lost in others. (2) We expect that the frequency of the A 1 allele will be the same in each district after many generations as it was when we first assessed it. (3) Fixation or loss of the A 1 allele should occur slower in the districts than in the Capital. a. (1) only b. (2) only c. (1) and (3) d. (2) and (3) e. All of the above f. None of the above
19. We have been sampling variation at neutral loci in 14 isolated populations not in HWE: 13 districts of 1000 people each, and a Capitol with 7,000 people. The districts have been separated from each other and from the Capitol (without migration) for 100 generations. After 100 generations, migration begins to occur between the districts, and between the districts and the Capitol. Which of the following are expectations for how variation will change after migration begins? (1) We expect variation to increase within the districts, but decrease in the Capital. (2) We expect variation to be unchanged in any of the populations. (3) We expect the frequency of heterozygotes to decrease in all populations.
20. There are 4000 streaked tenrecs. Individuals who are homozygous for A1A1 have two yellow stripes, individuals that are heterozygous have one yellow
stripe, and individuals who are homozygous for A2A2 have no stripes. But stripes are awesome, and individuals with stripes have no selective disadvantage. The selective coefficient for individuals with no stripes is 0.3. The selective coefficient for individuals with one stripe is 0.1. If the initial frequency of tenrecs with two stripes is 0.4, given the selective coefficients in this example, and assuming no drift or migration, what are the expected ending frequencies in the population of tenrecs with no stripes after one generation:
7

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture