West palm beach boca raton arcades in new florida

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West Palm Beach Boca Raton Arcades in new Florida mixed-use development. D E S I G N R E V I E W D I S T R I C T S A L L D I S T R I C T S BU I L D I N G D E S I G N T a l l a h a s s e e - L e o n C o u n t y P l a n n i n g D e p a r t m e n t 3.b. G A I N E S S T R E E T µ¸ 3.b.8. Design for the Weather P edestrians’ comfort is crucial to walkable streets. Pedestrians will choose the driest, coolest, most comfortable route to their destination, avoiding less comfortable blocks and gaps in overhead sun and weather protection. Building design should respond to Tallahassee’s heat, humidity, rain and strong sunshine, and recognize that winter days can be cold. Many visual elements of traditional building in the South originated as devices to mitigate climate conditions: balconies; tall, double-hung windows, french doors, and shutters, for ventilation and light; arcades, colonnades, deep porches, awnings, and canopies for shade; light colors to reflect heat. These elements should still be used in response to climate and light, not just as decoration. PRINCIPLES Evoke a Sense of Place Enrich the Public Realm Put Pedestrians First Build to Human Scale Entertain the Eye Recognition of Tallahassee’s climate should be evident in the city’s architecture. Sun and weather protection devices appropriate to Tallahassee include: Arcades are series of piers topped by arches, supporting a permanent roof or inset into a building facade. A colonnade is similar to an arcade, but is supported by columns with straight lintels. Awnings and canopies are located over doors, windows, or sidewalks. An awning is attached to the facade of a building, and provides sun and weather protection, identity, and decoration. Awnings are typically stretched over a lightweight metal structure, and may be fixed or retractable. More substantial but with the same purpose as an awning, a canopy of metal and/or glass usually is fixed in place. Functionally, awnings and canopies are nearly interchangeable. For purposes of these guidelines, awning shall refer to fixed or retractable fabric construction, and canopy to all other fixed construction. Balconies shade windows and sidewalks, and protect pedestrians from rain. See page 62. Brise-soleil (French, “sun breaker” ) refers to a variety of
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Crocker Park OH Awnings add color and promote the image of an active market. Euclid St., St. Louis Paris The underside of an awning may be lighted to reflect light onto the area beneath it. West Palm Beach A composition of balconies, awnings, tall windows, shutters and an arcade, held together by a single intense color. New York Use awnings and canopies to shade clear glass at store windows. Internally-illuminated awning-like signs are not permitted.
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