Dietary Supplements Fall 2012

Folic acid(b9(folate folic acid deficiency anemia

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Unformatted text preview: Folic acid (B9) (folate) Folic acid deficiency anemia Mouth sores Diarrhea Deficiency in pregnant women is associated with an increased risk of neural tube defects Products containing more than 0.8 mg of folic acid are Rx only Cyanoco- balamin (B12) B12 deficiency anemia Neurologic changes Smooth, red tongue Water Soluble Vitamins Vitamin C Symptoms of Deficiency Other Ascorbic acid Fatigue Bruising Slow wound healing Recurrent infections Toxicity (> 2000mg/day): Can cause kidney stones Hyperoxaluria Headache N/V/D Comments: Causes urinary acidification Improves iron absorption Data is inconsistent for prevention and treatment of the common cold Let’s review calcium supplements Calcium carbonate Calcium citrate Calcium gluconate Absorption/administration Adverse effects Elemental calcium per product What are the recommendations for bone health? Calcium ? Vitamin D ? Calcium Supplements Food sources: ◦ Meat, liver, legumes, cereal, green leafy veggies RDA: 400 mcg/day ◦ Women of childbearing age: 400 mcg/day ◦ Pregnant women: 600 mcg/day Folic Acid Supplements http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/folicacid/about.html Accessed Sept. 10, 2009 FDA mandated cereals to be fortified with “adequate” folate (1998) Folic Acid Supplements http://www.cdc.gov/NCBDDD/folicacid/data.html Accessed Nov. 15, 2012 http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/spinabifida/data.html Accessed Nov. 15, 2012 Daily requirements: ◦ Absorption: 0.5-1.5mg/day ~10% of elemental iron is absorbed ◦ Loss: 1mg/day Iron Supplements http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/iron.pdf. Accessed Nov. 15, 2012. Iron Supplements http://ods.od.nih.gov/pdf/factsheets/iron.pdf. Accessed Nov. 2, 2011. Food sources ◦ Meat, liver, eggs, spinach, dried nuts, beans, fortified cereals/breads/pasta, etc. Oral supplements: ◦ Gluconate (Fergon) 240mg ◦ Sulfate: 325mg Slow-FE: 142mg Drops: 15mg/mL ◦ Fumurate FemIron: 63mg Ferretts: 325mg Precautions: ◦ Children Adverse effects: ◦ Constipation ◦ GI upset ◦ Dark stools Dietary interactions: ◦ Decrease absorption: coffee, dairy, soy, spinach, tea (tannins) ◦ Increase absorption: vitamin C Iron Supplements Contain 3 or more vitamins Generally have: ◦ Vitamins: A, C, D, E ◦ B vitamins (1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12) ◦ Calcium Women’s vitamins Men’s vitamins 50+ Multivitamins Natural and Herbal Products* Echinacea Ginseng Ginkgo Garlic St. John’s Wort Saw palmetto Fish oil/omega-3 Glucosamine/chondroitin CoQ10 *Not all inclusive http://nccam.nih.gov/news/camstats/2007/graphics.htm Accessed Nov. 15, 2012http://nccam....
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Folic acid(B9(folate Folic acid deficiency anemia Mouth...

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