What is the most common type of congenital heart

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Childhood: Voyages in Development
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Chapter 4 / Exercise 23
Childhood: Voyages in Development
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10. What is the most common type of congenital heart defect assessed for in infants? a. Atrial septal defect (ASD) b. Ventricular septal defect (VSD) c. Tetralogy of Fallot d. Atrioventricular canal defect ANS: B
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Childhood: Voyages in Development
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 4 / Exercise 23
Childhood: Voyages in Development
Rathus
Expert Verified
The most common type of congenital heart defect is a VSD. REF: p. 660 11. An 8-week-old infant’s well-baby check reveals a murmur, and an echocardiogram shows a large ventricular septal defect. If left untreated, what condition could develop?
REF: p. 660 12. A 22-year-old pregnant woman presents to her OB/GYN for a prenatal checkup. The fetal heartbeat sounds irregular, and a fetal echocardiogram reveals an atrioventricular canal (AVC) defect. This defect is the result of:
REF: p. 660 13. A newborn experiences frequent periods of cyanosis, usually occurring during crying or after feeding. Which cardiac diagnosis does this history support?
REF: p. 661 TestBankWorld.org
14. A newborn child has a murmur and is cyanotic. An echocardiogram reveals that the tricuspid valve failed to develop and so no blood flows between the right atrium and ventricle. This condition is described with the term tricuspid: a. regurgitation. b. stenosis. c. atresia. d. transposition. ANS: C Tricuspid atresia is failure of the tricuspid valve to develop; consequently, there is no communication from the right atrium to the right ventricle. In regurgitation, blood moves backward, but is not obstructed. In stenosis, blood flow is narrowed, but not totally obstructed. In transposition, the two great vessels are on opposite sides.
REF: p. 662

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