Relations to enhance the programs image with

This preview shows page 175 - 178 out of 549 pages.

relations to enhance the program’s image with potential sponsors, decision makers, or the general public; staff training, including the training of the direct service staff; recruiting and retention of key personnel; developing and maintaining relationships with affiliated programs, referral sources, and other external collaborators; obtaining materials required for services; and general advocacy on behalf of the target population served. Program process evaluation schemes can, and often should, incorporate indicators of vital program support functions along with indicators relating to service activities. In form, such indicators and the process for identifying them are no different than for program services. The critical activities first must be identified and described in specific, concrete terms resembling service units; for example, units of fund-raising activity and 175
dollars raised, number, length, and quality of training sessions, number and characteristics of attendees at advocacy events, and the like. Measures are then developed that are capable of differentiating good from poor performance. These measures can then be included in the process evaluation or program monitoring procedures along with those dealing with other aspects of program performance. Exhibit 4-G Summertime Distribution of Books for Children in Low- Income Communities Noting persistent achievement gaps between economically disadvantaged children and their more affluent peers and the academic slide that occurs for lower performing children during the summer, a pilot book distribution program was established in four low-income neighborhoods. During the summer in both Detroit and Washington, D.C., age-appropriate books were placed in vending machines designed to dispense the books (see picture) at no cost. The vending machines were placed in high-traffic places near churches or childcare centers and available to passers-by. Books were restocked frequently, and new titles, including fiction and nonfiction offerings, were added throughout the summer. Childcare centers and parents were notified of the availability of the books and the location of the machines. The evaluators made a total of 48 two-hour observations of the activity around the vending machines and conducted short interviews with individuals who either retrieved books or viewed them without taking one. They also administered several short assessments, including book title recognition and pre- and postsummer assessments of children’s reading skills. 176
During the summer, the vending machines distributed 64,435 books in total, 59% of which went to return users. On average, 180 people passed the sites over the 2-hour observation periods, and about 50 of them visited the vending machines. The visitors were primarily people of color, and the majority at each site were female. The percentage of repeat visitors ranged from 33% to 52%. The numbers of books obtained by children of different age ranges were similar, with slightly fewer for 10- to 14-year-olds. More than two thirds of the books distributed were fiction. Interestingly, children who visited the vending

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture