Figure 6 additional management interfaces on

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Figure 6 Additional management interfaces on XenServer For more information on how to configure the Celerra iSCSI target with multiple network portals, refer to Celerra iSCSI configuration for XenServer host . Using EMC Celerra IP Storage with Citrix XenServer over iSCSI, CIFS, and NFS Best Practices Planning 13
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Figure 7 illustrates the recommended network topology for the XenServer host to access Celerra iSCSI storage. Figure 7 Celerra iSCSI networking with XenServer In the case of CIFS or NFS, network redundancy can be achieved by leveraging Celerra Fail-Safe Network (FSN). FSN is a logical interface that consists of one primary device and one or more standby devices. Should the active path fail on the primary device, one of the standby devices takes over and provides a transparent transition for the clients. The primary device typically uses one gigabit link. Should the need arise to add another link to increase the aggregated throughput, the primary device can be reconfigured to add another logical interface as a part of an LACP or Etherchannel. This is a perfect example of how flexible Celerra is, in terms of configuring network interfaces using multiple layers of logical interfaces. Refer to Configuring and Managing EMC Celerra Network High Availability for detail on how to configure an FSN device. On the XenServer side, NIC bonds can improve host resiliency by using two physical NICs as if they were one. If one NIC within the bond fails, the host’s network traffic will automatically be routed over the second NIC. NIC bonds work in an active/active mode, with traffic balanced between the bonded NICs. XenServer supports Source Level Balancing (SLB) NIC bonding. SLB bonding: Is an active/active mode, but only supports load balancing of VM traffic across the physical NICs Provides failover support for all other traffic types Does not require switch support for Etherchannel or 802.3ad (LACP) Load balances traffic between multiple interfaces at VM granularity by sending traffic through different interfaces based on the source MAC address of the packet Is derived from the open-source ALB mode and reuses the ALB capability to dynamically re- balance load across interfaces Using EMC Celerra IP Storage with Citrix XenServer over iSCSI, CIFS, and NFS Best Practices Planning 14
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Figure 8 shows how a NIC bond can be created through XenCenter by selecting the Create Bond button on the NICs tab. Note that you can only choose exactly two physical NICs to form a bond since the Add button will be grayed out once two NICs have been added. Although the command line allows a NIC bond to be created with more than two interfaces, Citrix supports the NIC bond with two interfaces only. Because XenServer NIC bonding does not require switch support for port channeling protocols, the switch ports to which the bonded interfaces are connected can be configured as simple “straight through” ports that are assigned to the same subnet. Figure 9
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