Environmental factors abuse mental stress a significant loss or some other

Environmental factors abuse mental stress a

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Environmental factors - abuse, mental stress, a "significant loss," or some other traumatic event may contribute to bipolar disorder risk. 3. Treatment: Bipolar disorder requires lifelong treatment that includes a combination of therapies, which may include medications and physical and psychological interventions. Medications Mood stabilizers . typically mood-stabilizing medication are used to control manic or hypomanic episodes. Examples of mood stabilizers include lithium (Lithobid), valproic acid (Depakene), divalproex sodium (Depakote), carbamazepine (Tegretol, Equetro, others) and lamotrigine (Lamictal). Antipsychotics . olanzapine (Zyprexa), risperidone (Risperdal), quetiapine (Seroquel), aripiprazole (Abilify), ziprasidone (Geodon), lurasidone (Latuda) or asenapine (Saphris) Antidepressants. antidepressant can sometimes trigger a manic episode, it's usually prescribed along with a mood stabilizer or antipsychotic.
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Anti-anxiety medications . Benzodiazepines may help with anxiety and improve sleep. Benzodiazepines are generally used for relieving anxiety only on a short-term basis. CBT (cognitive behavioral therapy) - The focus of cognitive behavioral therapy is identifying unhealthy, negative beliefs and behaviors and replacing them with healthy, positive ones. It can help identify what triggers your bipolar episodes. You also learn effective strategies to manage stress and to cope with upsetting situations. Generalized Anxiety Disorder GAD is more than the normal anxiety people experience day to day. It’s chronic and exaggerated worry and tension without reason. People with this disorder can’t seem to shake their concerns, even though they usually realize that their anxiety is more intense than the situation warrants. Daily life becomes a constant state of worry, fear, and dread. Occasionally the anxiety dominates the person's thinking so much so that it interferes with daily functioning, including work, school, social activities, and relationships. 1 SYMPTOMOLOGY: Excessive anxiety and worry occurring more days than not for at least 6 months, about a number of events or activities. Restlessness or feeling keyed up or on edge Being easily fatigued Difficulty concentrating or mind going blank Unrealistic view of problems Irritability Muscle tension
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