Page 137 Making Responsible Decisions Global Ethics and Global EconomicsThe

Page 137 making responsible decisions global ethics

This preview shows page 16 - 18 out of 112 pages.

Incidentally, 99 percent of shoes worn in the United States are imported. Page 137 Making  Responsible  Decisions Global Ethics and Global Economics—The Case of Protectionism ethics World trade benefits from free and fair trade among nations. Nevertheless, governments of many  countries continue to use tariffs and quotas to protect their various domestic industries. Why?  Protectionism earns profits for domestic producers and tariff revenue for the government. There is a cost,  however. Protectionist policies cost Japanese consumers between $75 billion and $110 billion annually.  U.S. consumers pay about $70 billion each year in higher prices because of tariffs and other protective  restrictions. Sugar and textile import quotas in the United States, automobile and banana import tariffs in European  countries, shoe and automobile tire import tariffs in the United States, beer import tariffs in Canada, and  rice import tariffs in Japan protect domestic industries but also interfere with world trade for these  products. Regional trade agreements, such as those found in the provisions of the European Union and 
Image of page 16
the North American Free Trade Agreement, may also pose a situation whereby member nations can  obtain preferential treatment in quotas and tariffs but nonmember nations cannot. Protectionism, in its many forms, raises an interesting global ethical question. Is protectionism, no matter  how applied, an ethical practice? quota  is a restriction placed on the amount of a product allowed to enter or leave a country. Quotas  can be mandated or voluntary and may be legislated or negotiated by governments. Import quotas seek  to guarantee domestic industries access to a certain percentage of their domestic market. For example,  there is a limit on Chinese dairy products sold in India, and in Italy there is a quota on Japanese  motorcycles. China has import quotas on corn, cotton, rice, and wheat. The United States also imposes quotas. For instance, U.S. sugar import quotas have existed for more  than 70 years and preserve about half of the U.S. sugar market for domestic producers. American  consumers pay $3 billion annually in extra food costs because of this quota. U.S. quotas on textiles are  estimated to add 50 percent to the wholesale price of clothing for American consumers—which, in turn,  raises retail prices. The major industrialized nations of the world formed the  World Trade Organization (WTO)  in 1995 to  address an array of world trade issues. 3  There are 159 WTO member countries, including the United  States, which account for more than 90 percent of world trade. The WTO is a permanent institution that 
Image of page 17
Image of page 18

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 112 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture