WOOD THE CREATION OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC 1776 1787 at 165 1969 George Mason

Wood the creation of the american republic 1776 1787

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WOOD, THE CREATION OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, 1776-1787, at 165 (1969). George Mason, former Governor of Virginia remarked, "[Representatives] ought to mix with the people, think as they think, feel as they feel,---ought to be perfectly amenable to them, and thoroughly acquainted with their interest and condition." CECELIA M. KENYON. THE ANTI- FEDERALISTS at lii (1966) (quoting Richard H. Lee, Letters of a Federal Farmer, in PAMPHLETS ON THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES 288, 288-89 (Paul L. Ford ed., 1888)). The early state constitutions also had declarations and controls to make legislatures "like" the people. See infra notes 34-39 and accompanying text (describing such declarations and controls in the Mary- land, Delaware, Pennsylvania, North Carolina, Virginia, and Massachusetts Constitutions). [Vol. 41: 1
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1991] TERM LIMITATIONS out any direct input of the colonists to represent American interests, early Americans were tired of being represented by people whose interests differed greatly from their own.2 * This notion of legislative similarity and proximity apparently had demo- graphic implications, with some people insisting that the legislature should re- present all professions. 8 0 These people argued that a demographically similar legislature would make good law because it would do what the people would do if assembled personally. 81 Thus, early drafters of the state constitutions tried to make legislatures as much like the people as possible. 2 However, as the preratification experience of American state governments illustrates, one of the problems with the goal of a demographically similar legislature was that it 29. A belief in virtual representation, the theory that certain nonvoting citizens could be ade- quately represented by legislators elected by other citizens with similar interests, was sometimes offered as a justification for Parliament's authority over the American colonies. But colonial Americans reacted strongly against the idea that members of Parliament (for whom the Ameri- cans did not vote) could virtually represent them, because the colonists' interests were perceived to differ greatly from those of British subjects across the Atlantic who did vote. For a description of the American rejection of virtual representation and early thoughts on actual representation, see WOOD, supra note 28, at 173-88. 30. Antifederalist Richard Henry Lee stated, "[A] fair representation, therefore, should be so regulated, that every order of men in the community ... can have a share in [the legislature]-in order to allow professional men, merchants, traders, farmers, mechanics, etc. to bring a just pro- portion of their best informed men respectively into the legislature .... KENYON, supra note 28, at lii (quoting 3 THE DEBATES IN THE SEVERAL STATE CONVENTIONS ON THE ADOPTION OF THE FEDERAL CONSTITUTION AS RECOMMENDED BY THE GENERAL CONVENTION AT PHILADELPHIA, IN 1787, at 32 (Jonathan Elliot ed., 2d ed. 1896)).
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