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Song of Songs Interpretation

As they are about to be wed and attribute the bride

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as they are about to be wed and attribute the Bride with the soul or the Church, and the Bridegroom with the Word of God (Origen). In this symbolic interpretation, Origen is referencing to the concept of the previously mentioned Bridal Chamber, a holy “place” in which the husband and wife are joined together by a spiritual marriage and become one with each other and God. Throughout the Song of Songs, there are several references to the “chambers” and the passions of love. In the first chapter, it begins with “Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth!” and being brought into the king’s chambers (Songs 1:2). In the first part of the Scripture alone, there is a physical and spiritual interpretation that can be made with the kissing of the mouth and reference to a chamber. Another theme to note is the repeated use of the phrase, “…do
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not stir up or awaken love until it is ready!” (Songs 2:7). Origen also touched on this similar theme in his Commentary, in which he warned against the reading of the Song of Songs unless the reader was spiritually ready to fully understand the message. The Song praises the strong love between the two lovers, but also provides a bit of wisdom to the readers. Even while it is advising against stirring up love when it is not ready, the Scripture continues to portray the lovers lovingly fawning over each other’s physical attributes and expression of their erotic desires. In the way that the Song has such an open adulation of the physical body and the sexuality of the two lovers, even though there may be spiritual elements involved, the way that everything is portrayed seems to exemplify that this aspect of love is not one to be completely admonished. There are certain lines to be drawn, as illustrated by the repeated warnings against arousing love when it is not ready. Just as there are the spiritual interpretations of the text, there are also some sexual double entendres that can be noted as well. In In the seemingly normal descriptions in the text are some hidden meanings that can be derived from the original Hebrew words. Some examples of these “sexual euphemisms” include the awakening of her lover under the apple tree, her beloved thrusting his hand into the opening of her chambers, and the Bride saying that she would give her beloved the juice of her pomegranates in the chamber of the one who bore her. The first example has to do with the Hebrew words for “awakening” and the connotations associated with apple trees with the Hebrew context. The meaning associated in this case with “awakening” is more closely associated with sexual arousal and the meaning behind the apple tree has a similar sexual implication (Gault). Another case of this double meaning is in the verse which recounts the Bride’s dream: “My beloved thrust his hand through the opening and my inmost being yearned for him” (Songs 5:4). This verse can be interpreted in more than one way. The first interpretation
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looks at the Hebrew word for “hand”, which can be used to describe a man’s genitals. Therefore,
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