One appeal that Augustine makes is for the preacher to use all means to make

One appeal that augustine makes is for the preacher

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chapter seems to be more practical practice for the religious orator. One appeal that Augustine makes is for the preacher to use all means to make his message more persuasive by means of persuasive techniques of classical rhetorical. On the other hand, a reader can also gain insight into the attitudes prevalent during his era: consummation of the marriage was for procreation, not pleasure. Women did not seem to play a role in rhetorical training of youngsters as Quintilian proposes. A famous line from Augustine is his paraphrase of Cicero’s “instruct his listener, give him pleasurek, stir his emotions” (Brutus , xlix:186); Augustine prefers “instruct, delight and move” (Book 4, 10:24). Along with discussion on proper interpretation of biblical passages, he also argues for a literary value of the Bible but weakly supports his proposition by quoting extensive passages and briefly stating its worth instead of extensive support. Bailey, Kenneth. Southern White Protestantism in the Twentieth Century. 1964. Gloucester: Harper and Row, 1968. Although Bailey speaks of the Southern church and its various changes over time, he emphasizes that the church congregation believed that single-race churches were the best idea. After the Civil War, the southern church-goers desired to maintain racial segregation . Cone, Cecil W . The Identity Crisis in Black Theology . Nashville: AMEC, 1975. This little book takes several black theologians/scholars and critiques their stance. Cecil Cone starts with his own premise of black religion (that there is a "true" black religion which incorporates culture and spiritual experience) and then explores those of others, notably Joseph R. Washington, author who criticizes Martin Luther King and James Cone, who seems (according to Cecil) to have a fixation on black liberation. In each critique, C. Cone gives an overview of the scholarship of five black authors, identifies the weakness of each and applies his stance of "an experience with God" as a plumb line. Cone, James. Risks of Faith. Boston: Beacon, 1999. James Cone, brother of Cecil Cone, explains his transformation from a study of Euro-American aspects of religion to a stance on black liberation, which should (according to him) define all religion. He interprets Jesus' teachings as "liberation" and attacks "white" religion for distortion of the Bible to suit the purposes of the white church-goer. He then goes on to define spirituals as songs for liberation and calls for a re-intrepretation of the Bible to fit the liberation theme. He also gives general directions for inclusion of women in the pulpit. Conley, Thomas M. Rhetoric in the European Tradition. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1990. Conley looks over several periods of rhetorical tradition, starting with ancient Greece, then Rome and moves all the way to the 20 th century. His discussion of rhetoric is more complete than Kennedy’s (restricted to classical rhetoric). In each chapter, Conley reviews the orators, theory and practices of a designated period. Each chapter also contains excerpts of two or more works by the rhetors of his discussion. the book starts like most texts on rhetoric, with classical Greek
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