Is e anbarasan deal could save sri lanka truce bbc

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IS E. Anbarasan, 'Deal could save Sri Lanka truce', BBC News, 24 Feb. 2006, south_asia/4746068.stm, accessed 24 February 2006. 73 International Affairs 83: I, 200oo7 ? 2007 The Author(s). Journal Compilation @ 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/The Royal Institute of International Affairs This content downloaded from 202.41.10.3 on Wed, 29 Jun 2016 13:23:55 UTC All use subject to
Chris Smith The second round of Geneva peace talks, scheduled for 24 April, was postponed by the LTTE on the grounds that the leadership was unable to hold consultations with regional commanders in the east. The talks were aimed at strengthening the CFA and could have acted as a useful confidence- building exercise but, again predictably, this proved not to be the case. The postponement of the talks was certainly a consequence and possibly also a cause of further severe deterioration of conditions in the north and east, notably Trinco- malee; in the week beginning io April more than 60 people were killed in daily attacks. The military across the north had hitherto been the main targets, but on 12 April for the first time civilians were attacked when a market bomb in the eastern town of Trincomalee killed 16 people. The government blamed the LTTE, which issued the standard denial; but it was widely believed that the attack was carried out by a pro-government paramilitary group. The bombing led directly to communal violence and to the killing of Tamil civilians and the destruction of Tamil homes by Sinhalese extremists. Thereafter, limited local attacks on the Sri Lankan forces by the LTTE continued. In response, Sri Lankan forces and paramilitary groups continued to target LTTE members and Tamil civilians suspected of being sympa- thetic to the LTTE, allegedly executing seven innocent students in the clear view of bystanders, only one of whom dared to report the details of the incident to a human rights organization.'6 Behind the scenes, the LTTE has been working persistently to recruit new cadres, largely on the basis of sheer terror in both the 'uncleared' areas and the so-called 'cleared' areas where its influence remains significant. On 25 April a female suicide bomber penetrated the security cordon protecting the army chief of staff, Lt General Fonseka. The resulting explosion, detonated just as Fonseka was leaving the secure compound, killed eleven people, including the bodyguards providing close support protection. Fonseka was badly injured but recovered and has now returned to work. On 26 June the third most senior ranking Sri Lankan army officer, Major-General Parami Kulatanga, was less fortunate and was killed in a Black Tiger suicide attack on his way to work. The government's retaliation to the Fonseka attack was swift. The arterial A9 route to Jaffna was closed and all permissions to enter the 'uncleared' areas were denied.

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