Of those in lower classes of society who are

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of those in lower classes of society who are overlooked and forgotten about because the higher class individuals believe God only "[has] prejudgment of human beings as guilt-ridden dust (Gen3:19), worms (Job 25:2-6), and embodiments of sin or depravity (Exod 20:5)," (Brantley 160) forthe poor and those who are less fortunate. By analyzing the comments made in other analysis, such as that of Keane's, Brantley is giving deeper insight, and appreciation for Emily Dickinson's activism for her time. Activism in the sense that she fights for the image of equality, and existence for both genders who are overlooked and underappreciated (women), and people who are born with an appearance they cannot change, because God made them that way purposefully, and inevitably (being born with the purpose to suffer). Dickinson alludes to Jesus as being a human born with a purpose for suffering, but still having compassion for those who were poor equally to those who were rich to support her theology that humans are all born withinan equal image. Dickinson, according to Brantley, criticizes those of her society who have more compassion for those who live lavish rather than the neighbor who struggles to live. She criticizes the religious speakers who quarrel about who is worthy enough to be seen equal to Christ, in comparison to those of science who have evidence all humans are equal through the common ancestor that Darwin has found (Brantley 163). And Brantley quotes her saying. "‘To behuman,' she writes, ‘is more than to be divine, for when Christ was divine, he was uncontented till he had been human' (L 519)," (Brantley 161). Like the Muslims, who do not believe in the trinity, Dickinson sees Jesus as a separate entity from the all-powerful God he was birthed from. She believes while Christ was a human salvation sent to experience what God has not, she uses that to question God's purpose of creation in man, " ‘Twas Christ's own personal Expanse / That bore him from the Tomb—" (Fr 1573)—Jesus is remembered not as an agent of God's salvation but as one who lived courageously on the other side of danger (experior, to go through danger)," (Brantley 161). And for this reason, both Brantley and Keane believe while many have an idea that Emily Dickinson had a purpose to create literature to support a theology for equality, she failed to completely find an answer that supports enough evidence of equality like Darwin did, because she too questioned both science and religion to the last of her days.
Hughes, Glenn, "Love, Terror, and Transcendence in Emily Dickinson's Poems," Renascence. Vol. 66 Issue 4, Fall 2016, pp. 283-304Glenn Hughes writes this essay article in appreciation for the transcendentalism period that Emily Dickinson absorbed and perpetuated in her poems. He compliments her use of using rhythmic narrative to express her journey by finding spirituality against the norms of her society.

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