Opioid Epidemic in the United States.docx

Determinants of health outside and within the

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determinants of health outside and within the healthcare system, as well as, “upstream” interventions such as housing conditions and improving the socioeconomic status of citizens (Williams, Costa, Odunlami & Mohammed, 2008). Research evidence suggests that in delivering health care services, providers who view individuals as more than just a system of organs and instead also account for the social context have more impact in improving the patient’s health. Moreover, communities with larger economic and social policies that positively enhance the quality of life and living conditions in addition to having sufficient economic resources can also significantly affect health (Wiese, Piercey, & Clark, 2018). Even policies in areas considered remote from health care can still have significant implications on the population’s health. Therefore, it is crucial to dedicate greater attention to the enactment of progressive economic and social policies to possible health
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OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN THE UNITED STATES 9 consequences. More importantly, healthcare providers, policy makers, and leaders from the various sectors of the economy should use available knowledge to improve living conditions and reduce disparities in health and healthcare services (Williams, et al., 2008). Primary Care Physicians’ Perspectives on the Prescription Opioid Epidemic Primary care physicians are crucial stakeholders in the success of ongoing and proposed efforts to address the opioid epidemic. However, despite their importance to the process of policing and implementation, there has been little effort from researchers to understand their perspective, attitudes, and beliefs concerning the issue of prescription opioid abuse. One study assessed the primary care physicians’ knowledge of opioid abuse and diversion, as well as their preferred regulatory and clinical interventions to address opioid-related mortality and morbidity. The survey conducted in 2014 and sampled response from 1010 primary care physicians revealed that a majority of the physicians cited individual-oriented factors as the causes of prescription opioid use disorder. In addition, the respondents believed that physicians and the affected individuals are primal in addressing the problem. Although the physicians had negative attitudes toward people with prescription opioid use disorder, most of them believed that treatment could be effective. Additionally, a majority of the respondent supported policies requiring close monitoring of prescription to patients who are at a high risk of opioid use disorder and upstream educational intervention for primary care physicians. The article recommended the integration of physician support to efforts meant to curb the epidemic (Hwang et al., 2016). Another study showed that all physicians acknowledged that prescription drug abuse is a major problem in their various communities. However, only 66% knew that the root cause of abuse was swallowing pills whole. Nearly 46% erroneously believed that formulations that are
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OPIOID EPIDEMIC IN THE UNITED STATES 10 abuse-deterrent were not as addictive as their counterparts. Moreover, 25% of the physicians
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  • Spring '17
  • opioid abuse

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Christopher Reinemann
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