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The point of todays lab is to introduce you to

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Image. The Point of Today’s Lab is to introduce you to Microscope Alignment, wherein the Optical Components on your Microscope are brought into Optimal Configuration. Brightfield Microscopy (Atlas Figure 4-2A, Page 32) There are three commonly used Types of Microscopy: Brightfield, Darkfield and Phase Contrast. Brightfield Microscopy is probably the most commonly used form of Light Microscopy for Bacteria, where Light Microscopy can reveal Shape, and with the appropriate Stains, distinguish different Bacteria and some of their Cell Components. Brightfield Microscopy produces the Maximum possible Resolution.
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Lab 3 Page 19 The Concept of Brightfield Alignment The Alignment of your Microscope involves three distinct but interrelated Set-Ups: Set-Up 1 You set the Working Distance between the Specimen and the Objective Lens. Set-Up One is probably the Easiest. You’ll set the Working Distance between the Specimen and the Objective Lens by using the Fine and Coarse Focus Controls to focus on the "P". The Focus of the "P" should not change once you have set it using the Fine and Coarse Focus Controls. At the End of the Alignment Protocol the "P" should still be in Focus. Set-Up 2 You set the Working Distance between the Condenser Lens and the Specimen. Set-Up Two is nearly as Easy. You’ll set the Working Distance between the Condenser Lens and the Specimen by using the Condenser Focus Knob to focus on the Image of the Polygon. It takes less than 1/4 of a Turn of the Condenser Focus Knob to do this. The Condenser Focus Knob lowers the Condenser from its Fully Raised Position and positions the Apex of the Solid Cylinder of Light on the Specimen. Do not use the Fine and Course Focus Controls for Set-Up 2. Set-Up 3 You center the Solid Cylinder of Light and trim the Solid Cone of Light projected through the System. Set-Up Three is actually intercalated into the previous two Steps. You’ll be using the Microscope Controls to appropriately size and center the Field Diaphragm (so you’ll project an appropriately sized Solid Cylinder of Light into the Condenser) and the Condenser Diaphragm (so you’ll project an appropriately trimmed Solid Cone of Light onto the Specimen). You and your Lab Partner should both practice aligning your Microscope for Brightfield Microscopy. What works well here is for one Lab Partner to read the Alignment Instructions while the other Lab Partner does the actual Alignment; then trade Roles. Remember, you ʼ ll be tested individually over your Ability to align your Microscope.
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Lab 3 Page 20 Some Important Terms used in Microscopy: Magnification Magnification is defined as the Ratio of the Apparent Size of an Object viewed through the Microscope compared to its Apparent Size when viewed by the Naked Eye at a Distance of 25 Centimeters (10 Inches). The Magnification of your Zeiss Microscope is the Product of the 10X Magnification Power of the Ocular Lens and the Magnification Power of each of the Objective Lens: 3.2X, 10X, 40X or 100X. So the Magnification of your Microscope will be 32X, 100X, 400X or 1000X, depending on the Objective Lens you use.
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