Pat Edwards the engine mechanic was guessing the engine problem was related to

Pat edwards the engine mechanic was guessing the

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Pat Edwards, the engine mechanic, was guessing the engine problem was related to ambient air temperature. When it was cold, the different expansion rates for the head and block seemed to be damaging the head gasket and causing the engine failures. It was below freezing last night, which meant a cold morning for starting the race. Robin Burns, the chief mechanic, did not agree with Pat’s “gut feeling”. The data seemed to support Robin’s position (see Exhibit 1) in that the gasket failures had occurred over the entire temperature range. This suggested that temperature was not the issue. Robin had been racing for twenty years and believed that luck was an important element in success. “In racing, you are pushing the limits of what is known,” Robin argued, “and that means some things are not going to be under control. If you want to win, you have to take risks. Everybody in racing knows it. The drivers have their lives on the line, I have a career that hangs on every race, and you have every dime tied up in the business. That’s the thrill: beating the odds and winning.” Last night over dinner Robin had added to this argument forcefully with Burns’ First Law of Racing : “Nobody ever won a race sitting in the pits.” BJ, Chris and Robin had discussed Carter Racing’s situation the previous evening. This first season was a success from a racing standpoint, with the team’s car finishing “in the money” (one of the top five) in 12 of the 15 races it completed. As a result, the sponsorship offers critical to the team’s business success were starting to come in. A big break had come two weeks ago after the Dunham race, where the team scored its fourth first-place finish.
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