Despite the existence of the automatic promotion

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Despite the existence of the automatic promotion policy in primary schools (especially government aided schools); continued existing. Figure 4.10 summarises the number of pupils who failed to advance to the next, Figure 4.10: Repetition Rate by Grade in Primary Schools The total repetition rate in 2011 stood at 10.2% compared to 10.9 % in 2010. Further analysis indicated a higher reption in primary one and primary six with a rate of 11.1% each. Repetition in P.1 may be connected to underage pupils, whereas for P.6 is due to pre-candidates deemed unfit to sit end of cycle exams. 4.5.2 Repetition in Primary schools by Region and Gender The Annual School Census 2011 also captured data on repeaters by region and gender to ascertain the region with more repetition rates. The findings are summarized in the table below: Table 4.4: Repetition in Primary Schools by Region and Gender Region Repeaters Repetition Rate Male Female Total Male Female Total Central 60,762 58,073 118,835 6.9% 6.3% 6.6% East 129,551 125,449 255,000 10.7% 10.2% 10.5% N. East 6,541 5,756 12,297 8.8% 9.8% 9.2% North 139,216 131,997 271,213 15.9% 15.9% 15.9% S. West 40,651 40,789 81,440 8.0% 7.7% 7.9% West 46,263 45,009 91,272 9.4% 9.1% 9.3% Grand Total 422,984 407,073 830,057 10.5% 10.0% 10.2% Results from table 4.6 above indicate a high repetition rate of 15.9% in the Northern region with the central region registering the lowest reption rate of 6.6%. The higher rates in the north might be associated to the instabilities that formally interrupted education in the region. Analysis by
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44 EDUCATION STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 2011 gender revealed a higher repetition rate on the side of male pupils (10.5%) against that of females (10%). 4.6 Pupils with Special Needs The Annual School Census 2011 also captured data on pupils with special needs by region and gender. The findings are summarized in the table below: Table 4.5: Special Needs by Region and Gender Region SNE pupils Proportion of SNE on Enrolment Male Female Total Male Female Total Central 18,387 16,324 34,711 2.1% 1.8% 1.9% East 33,867 30,595 64,462 2.8% 2.5% 2.6% N. East 1,063 712 1,775 1.4% 1.2% 1.3% North 27,498 25,412 52,910 3.1% 3.1% 3.1% S. West 8,011 6,759 14,770 1.6% 1.3% 1.4% West 15,145 13,427 28,572 3.1% 2.7% 2.9% Grand Total 103,971 93,229 197,200 2.6% 2.3% 2.4% Results from the table 4.5 above indicate 197,200 pupils with special needs a proportion of 2.4% on the total enrolment in primary school. The Northern region had the highest proportion of pupil with special needs (3.1%) with the north eastern region having the lowest proportion of 1.3%. 4.7 Orphans in Primary Schools 4.7.1 Proportion of Orphans by region The total number of orphans in the primary subsector was determined and expressed as a proportion to the total enrolment as indicated in table 4.6 below: Table 4.6: Proportion of Orphaned Pupils in Primary Schools by Region and Gender Region Ophans Proportion of Orphans Male Femal Total Male Female Total Central 180,016 175,791 355,807 20.4% 19.2% 19.8% East 152,787 148,738 301,525 12.7% 12.1% 12.4% N. East 14,081 11,140 25,221 18.9% 18.9% 18.9% North 137,245 133,131 270,376 15.7% 16.0% 15.8% S. West 86,968 85,539 172,507 17.1% 16.2% 16.6% West 71,361 67,214 138,575 14.5% 13.7% 14.1% Grand Total 642,458 621,553 1,264,011 15.9% 15.3% 15.6% The findings from the table above indicate a total of 1,264,553 pupils that had lost either a parent or both comprising 15.6% of the entire pupil enrolment in primary schools, with the proportion of boys slightly higher at 15.9% than that of girls (15.3%). A regional analysis indicated that the
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45 EDUCATION STATISTICAL ABSTRACT 2011 central region had the highest proportion of orphans (at 19.8%) compared to all other regions,
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  • Fall '19
  • The Bible, School types, Gymnasium, secondary schools, Primary schools

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