Television shapes american culture americans adopted

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TELEVISION SHAPES AMERICAN CULTURE Americans adopted television at a faster rate than radio or the automobile during the 1920s Children were especially influenced by shows like The Howdy Doody Show and Mickey Mouse Club Family sitcoms were popular like: I Love Lucy , Leave it to Beaver , The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet , and Father Knows Best TELEVISION SHAPES AMERICAN CULTURE Reinforced traditional social norms; no African-American characters and no discussion of real- life problems TV sped up the process of developing a national mass culture TV began to affect political campaigning, beginning with 1952 presidential elections Candidate with more money could buy more advertising time Focus Question: How did California respond to the increased demand for higher education? Chapter 36 Part 3: Social Issues of the 1950s Vocabulary Beatniks : small group of writers and artists in the 1950s and early 1960s who were critical of American society urban renewal: government programs for the redevelopment of urban areas termination policy : a policy ending all programs monitored by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. It also ended federal responsibility for the health and welfare of Native Americans rock-and-roll: popular music that grew out of the gospel and blues traditions of African Americans Elvis Presley: “King of Rock-and-Roll” who combined elements of African American blues, gospel, country songs, and Tin Pan Alley ballads CULTURAL MOVEMENT AGAINST CONFORMITY Critics complained that the quality of life had not increased despite material abundance Social critics complained about the emphasis in social conformity Lonely Crowd by sociologists David Riesman and Nathan Glazer lamented that Americans had sacrificed their individualism to fit into the larger community Man in the Grey Flannel Suit by Sloan Wilson told the story of a WWII veteran who could not find real meaning in life Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger mocked the phoniness of adult society IMPACT OF BEAT GENERATION
Beatniks, or the Beats , refused to conform to accepted ways of behavior Conformity stifled individualism Alan Ginsburg’s poem Howl and Jack Kerouac’s On the Road criticized the crass materialism and conformity of middle culture Rebel Without a Cause , starring James Dean , portrays a tormented teenager who rejects the values of the establishment Actor Marlon Brando became symbol of rebellion for portrayal of motorcycle gang leader in The Wild One LGBT COMMUNITY ORGANIZES IN CALIFORNIA Government and police persecution led to organizing by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people Harry Hay founded Mattachine Society, one of the first post WWII gay rights organizations, in Los Angeles in 1950 Supreme Court ruled in 1958 than Mattachine’s magazine One was not obscene, opening the way for other LGTB publications Daughters of Bilitis was founded in San Francisco in 1955 to advocate for lesbian civil rights Focus Question: What main criticisms did the Beats have of mainstream culture?

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