So interesting and worthwhile but remember the person

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so interesting and worthwhile. But remember, the person you are talking to also brings his or her own background to your conversation, too. For example, one listener may not be catching the same bus as you, so your information won’t be helpful, but another may have lost his or her timetable, so your information will be invaluable. Or, you may be coaching someone in a baseball league, so your advice about hitting might be well received, but another player may not care about doing well, so he or she may not really be listening. Perhaps they have never played this game before, and don’t really grasp what you are saying. All of these aspects of background can affect how well a message is received.
Lesson 16, page 6 English ENG2D-B Copyright © 2009 The Ontario Educational Communications Authority. All rights reserved. Feedback and Questions A good way to know how well your message is getting across is to pay attention to the feedback that you receive. If the listener answers you appropriately in words, you can be sure that the message was understood. If people smile, laugh, nod, yawn, or roll their eyes when you talk, they are saying something important about the message you have just given them. Effective feedback also occurs when a listener asks you questions. You may be asked to clarify a point so that the listener can understand the message fully. For example, if, when you ordered a coffee (as in the earlier example), the waiter had asked you, “Do you want your coffee with milk?” and you had answered “yes,” then you would have got your coffee the way you wanted it. Asking questions to obtain further information might also be important when you are trying to learn something. For example, if your teacher tells you that “Some verbs require an object,” and you don’t know what a verb is, you will need to ask a question. This feedback tells the teacher that more information is needed at this point. If your teacher tells you, “You should read Chapters 1 to 3,” and you are not sure whether that means you should include Chapter 3 in your reading or not, again, you would need to ask your teacher. A speaker can also get direct feedback by asking the audience whether the speech or presentation they have just heard was successful, or how it could be improved. Attentive Listening Hearing is not the same as listening. When you listen to music, do you always know what you have just heard? Can you tell the difference between the times when you let sounds “wash over you,” and the times when you actually listened for pleasure, attentively and appreciatively? How many times have people not paid attention to what you were saying, so you have had to repeat yourself ? When you communicate with others, you hope that they are paying attention, but the same is true when they are talking to you. There are many situations in which you need to listen carefully for information, distinguish what is
English ENG2D-B Lesson 16, page 7 Copyright © 2009 The Ontario Educational Communications Authority. All rights reserved.

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