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FinalL316Report-Group4

However this relationship is not statistically

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However this relationship is not statistically significant with a p-value of .168, meaning that the results of this sample have been due to random chance. Additionally, the R- square value of this test is 0.0029 meaning that age accounts for 0.29% of the variation in the change from incorrect to correct answers from taking the course. Table 6: Regression Analysis between age and incorrect answers given (Question 16) Variable B SE P R-squared Age -0.0086 0.0063 0.168 0.0029 Constant 0.113 0.084 0.182 The next true/ false question asked, “If you don’t know how far your partner wants to go you should always ask?” The results of this question found that 44% of 11-14 year olds and 50% of 15-18 year olds changed to the correct response of true after taking the program. In running the regression analysis again a correlation was found between ages and changing to the correct response. Once again however this was proven to not be significant with a b-coefficient of .179 (p<.05) and an R-square of .0028 meaning only 0.28% of the variation in switching to the correct answer can be explained by variation in age. Table 7a: Regression Analysis (Question 17) Variable B SE P R-squared Age -0.0086 0.0064 0.179 0.0028 Constant 0.144 0.087 0.098 The final question was multiple-choice question asking, “What is the age of consent in Indiana?” The results of this question found that 69% of 11-14 year olds and 83.3% of 15-18 year olds changed their answers to the correct answer of 16 years old for the age of consent after being in the program. The regression analysis on this question again found a correlation between age and choosing the correct answer after taking the test. Unlike the other two questions this analysis is significant with a b-coefficient of .047 (p<.05) meaning that we can take this correlation as true that according to the results for every year of age a student is 2.8% less likely to select the incorrect answer after being in the program. Table 7b: Regression Analysis (Question 20) Variable B SE P R-squared Age -0.0286 0.0144 0.047 0.0067 Constant 0.849 0.196 0.00 Decreased likelihood of using victim-blaming behavior To understand the relationship between age and the likelihood of using victim- blaming behavior, we will look at the answers to question 11 of the survey. Question 11 asks whether the participant thinks “Sometimes a person’s response to anger is uncontrollable” is a true or false statement. We will be looking for the answer “false” as
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it is the correct answer to understanding perpetuates victim-blaming behavior. Instead of looking at the total false answers before and after, we needed to look at the change in the answer of each participant in order to see if this program is useful. We created an extended dummy variable for each combination of answers before and after they go through the program. The variable we created gave each responder a value of -1, 0, or 1. The zero means that the responder did not change their answer, meaning they already know or did not learn the right material during the program. The negative one value is given to individuals that answered “false” first and then “true.” This is given a negative values because it signifies that the program has a negative impact on the participants understanding of victim-blaming behavior.
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