Where brazil would get the most for its educational

This preview shows page 32 - 38 out of 673 pages.

where Brazil would get the most for its educational investments. Conclusion Part I of this book takes the reader through a broad field, from climate change (chapter 1) to subsidies and trade barriers (chapter 10), and gives the best estimates of costs and benefits to the suggested op- portunities. Part II reports on the conclusions of the expert panel as well as their individual esti- mates and comments. The bottom line is that the Copenhagen Consensus suggests a way in which it might be possible to address head-on the issues of prioritisation. Many people have criticised this project – that prioritisation should be necessary at all. Yet, imagine if doctors at an overstretched hospital refused to perform triage on outpatients, but instead coped with patients as they arrived, focusing more attention on those whose families made the most fuss. We would never accept such an approach in the hospital – the approach would be unjust, waste precious resources and cost lives. We should not accept it for the rest of the world, either. In public discussion so far, the goodwill of dreamers rejecting prioritisation, seems to have captured the moral high ground. Are the realists really the ones making the evil prioritisations? Mea- sured by the effect on the world’s most vulnerable,
Introduction 9 I would tend to say exactly the opposite. It is not unethical to include knowledge about where we can do the most good. The Copenhagen Consensus is a deeply ethical project; but rather than playing to our bad conscience, it encourages positive and concrete action. I am proud that the Copenhagen Consensus has achieved its goal of making a prioritised list of op- portunities for the world. The experts have used their knowledge and insight; they have put in a great deal of effort to make estimates of concrete oppor- tunities. The Copenhagen Consensus has already started an important world-wide discussion on the prioritisation of the world’s resources. I hope that this book will encourage and provide information for researchers, politicians and citizens to engage even further in this crucial debate. References Devarajan , S., M. J. Miller and E. V. Swanson, 2002: Development goals: history, prospects and costs, World Bank Policy Research Working Paper, 13269 wps2819.pdf; summarized (slightly incorrectly) on the MDG’s web-page, WB%20MDG%20Costing.pdf Hahn , R., 1996: Risks, costs, and lives saved: getting better results from regulation , Oxford University Press, Oxford OECD , 2003: Statistical annex of the 2003 development co-operation report . , en 2649 37413 1893129 119687 1 1 37413,00.html
PART I The challenges
CHAPTER 1 Climate Change WILLIAM R. CLINE Introduction This chapter is part of the Copenhagen Consen- sus initiative of Denmark’s National Environmental Assessment Institute. This initiative seeks to evalu- ate the costs and benefits of alternative public policy actions in a wide range of key policy areas. For com- parability, each of the studies in this programme identifies a limited number of policy actions and

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture