Militia of Lexington 500 young boys and old men stood up to 700 British

Militia of lexington 500 young boys and old men stood

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Militia of Lexington (500 young boys and old men) stood up to 700 British soldiers 1,700 British soldiers at Concord It is unknown who shot first—Redcoats kills 8 Americans Minutemen responded “Shot Heard ‘Round the World” Shots that signaled the beginning of the American Revolution At Lexington and Concord Redcoats were discharged 8 Americans died Prohibitory Act Passed by Parliament Enforced by British navy who blockaded ports and seized American ships on the seas Attempt to coerce Americans into submission Effective declaration of War on Great Britain War declared on American commerce that cut off American trade Until colonists begged for pardon they were forbidden to trade with the rest of the world British blockaded ports and seized American ships Bunker Hill June 17 First major battle and bloodshed Showed that the Americans had a big potential to win due to public morale (minutemen) British forces took a huge hit but they managed to dislocate the American militiamen Americans were forced to withdraw after running out of ammunition and Bunker Hill was in British hands More British deaths 40% casualty rate Olive Branch Petition Adopted by the Continental Congress in a fortified attempt to avoid a full-blown war with Great Britain Not all of the Patriots wanted to declare their independence from Great Britain Sent a petition requesting from the king to make an agreement to fix the things they didn't agree with John Dickinson led this more moderate group of Patriots
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Petition was unsuccessful Affirmed American loyalty to Great Britain and entreated the king to prevent further conflict. Adopted by the Continental Congress in July 1775 in a fortified attempt to avoid a full-blown war with Great Britain Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation Dunmore was a loyalist Virginia's royal governor offered to free any slaves and indentured servants who would leave their patriot masters to join the British forces Hoped to augment the British army and disrupt the economy About 1000 slaves rallied to accept his offer 1776 Second Continental Congress Met in Philadelphia three weeks after the battles of Lexington and Concord They accumulated money and bought military supplies Refused to declare independence Delegates from colonies formed Continental Army with Washington as commander Issue paper money Declaration of Independence Adopted by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776 Written by Thomas Jefferson and signed by the 56 delegates of the Continental Congress New York abstained Contained a list of 95 grievances against George III Republican ideal of government Challenged American to make good on the deal that men were created equal Remains the most powerful and radical invitation to Americans of all backgrounds to demand their equality and full rights as human beings Paine’s “Common Sense” Systematically stripped kingship of historical and theological justification Persuaded ordinary folk to sever ties with Great Britain
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