The implementation of trade and customs barriers between the UK and EU could

The implementation of trade and customs barriers

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The implementation of trade and customs barriers between the UK and EU could lead to delays and increased costs in the passage of goods for corporate banking customers. This could negatively impact the levels of customer defaults and business volumes which may result in an increase in Barclays Group’s impairment charges and a reduction in revenues. Changes to current EU ‘Passporting’ rights may require further adjustment to the current model for Barclays Group’s cross-border banking operation which could increase operational complexity and/or costs. The ability to attract, or prevent the departure of, qualified and skilled employees may be impacted by the UK’s and the EU’s future approach to the EU freedom of movement and immigration from the EU countries and this may impact Barclays Group’s access to the EU talent pool. The legal framework within which Barclays Group operates could change and become more uncertain if the UK takes steps to replace or repeal certain laws currently in force, which are based on EU legislation and regulation (including EU regulation of the banking sector) following its withdrawal from the EU. Certainty around the ability to perform existing contracts, enforceability of certain legal obligations and uncertainty around the jurisdiction of the UK courts may be affected until the impacts of the loss of the current legal and regulatory arrangements between the UK and EU and the enforceability of UK judgements across the EU are fully known. Should the UK lose automatic qualification to be part of Single Euro Payments Area there could be a resultant impact on the efficiency of, and access to, European payment systems. In addition, loss of automatic qualification to the European Economic Area (EEA) or access to Financial Markets Infrastructure including exchanges, central counterparties and payment services could impact service provision for clients, likely resulting in reduced market share and revenue and increased operating costs for Barclays Group. There are certain execution risks relating to the transfer of Barclays Group’s European businesses to Barclays Bank Ireland Group. Technology change could result in outages or operational errors leading to delays in the transfer of assets and liabilities to Barclays Bank Ireland Group, and delayed delivery could lead to European clients losing access to products and service and increased reputational risk. iii) Interest rate rises adversely impacting credit conditions To the extent that central banks increase interest rates particularly in Barclays Group’s main markets, in the UK and the US, there could be an impact on consumer debt affordability and corporate profitability. While interest rate rises could positively impact Barclays Group’s profitability, as retail and corporate business income may increase due to margin decompression, future interest rate increases, if larger or more frequent than expectations, could cause stress in the lending portfolio and underwriting activity of Barclays Group. Higher credit losses driving an
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  • Fall '18
  • Angela
  • Meridian, Barclays, Barclays Bank Plc

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