3 As the speaker believes that man is to take care of Gods earth reck his rod

3 as the speaker believes that man is to take care of

  • DePaul University
  • ENGLISH WRD 104
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  • MegaIceGuineaPig1750
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3. As the speaker believes that man is to take care of God’s earth, “reck his rod” refers to God’s might, and why men do not fear it. Even though man continues to wreck earth, nature will never be “spent”, or used up. It’s beauty will far outlast man. “Bent” refers to the Holy ghost caring for the earth, much like a bird caring for her eggs.
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135. We Real Cool 1.In addition to end rime, the poem uses a lto internal rime thoughtout the stanzas such as cool and school, late and straight, sin and gin. 2. What is lost is the sense of collaboration between the speakers, as We being repeated at the end of each line brings about a sense of grouping. The poem also loses much of its musical quality, as when it is read with we at the beginning, the poem becomes almost proselike. 3. The criticism is not entirely justified as it is a poem. It is not advocating that every single student should leave school, and become hooligans. The teachers had much better intentions to what they wanted to convey to the students. 136. Blackberry Sweet 1. The refrain here is placed at the beginning of the stanza with the effect of effectively addressing the black girl of the poem. It is as if the reader can imagine the speaker talking to the black girl with long winded topics, yet reminding her that he addressing her specifically. 2. Each separate stanza is unified in the sense that each stanza has a specific topic it addresses. The first stanza compares the girl to berries. The second continues to describe her majestically. The third is a question of the girl’s effect on the speaker. What connects all of these stanzas is the beginning refrain of each stanza. The poem achieves climax with its form of the last line, where it says “jump stop shake”. When I read this, i stopped because of the spaces, much likes the speaker’s heart when he sees the girl. 137. Counting-out Rhyme 1. “bark of beech”, wood in lines 8-9; bark of beech assonance; beech and sallow, twig and willow; seen and leaf; oak and yoke consonance sallow and yellow, maple and apple, hollow and yellow half rime- beech and birch, yellow and willow, green and leaf, seen and green.yellow and hollow. 2. The poem is not to be taken seriously to be searched for a deeper meaning. It is what the title says it is. It is to be read aloud, and have its rhyme counted out.The poem just simply describes a variety of trees, using witty and crafty musical devices to make it unique. 3. A “counting-out rhyme” is a rhyme where elementary students or smaller children clap their hands along with a rhyme to help capture a sense of its rhythm and beat. The ones I can remember from my childhood are in Polish. 138. As imperceptibly as grief 1.The subject of the poem is the change of seasons, and how they always happen gradually. This annoys our speaker as the tone of the poem is sullen as the speaker is annoyed that she or he did not realize the change of seasons. It was “too imperceptible at last to seem like perfidy”, implies that although our reader does not feel betrayed, she still is bewildered by how quickly everything has changed. The opening line of
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