Musicians also needed to look north for work and it

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north in search of employment. Musicians also needed to look north for work, and it became evident that there were many more opportunities in the major cities like New York and Chicago. One group of white New Orleans musicians who came to be known as The Original Dixieland JassBand (ODJB) left for Chicago on March 2, 1916. They started playing at Shiller’s cafethe next day. Ten months later the ODJB created a sensation playing at Reisenweber’srestaurant in New York. They were advertised as ‘The First Sensational Amusement Novelty of 1917’, and drew the attention of record executives eager to capitalize on the excitement generated by this new music. By 1917, the "Jass" in their name became "Jazz." The Original Dixieland Jazz Band The first commercial attempt to record jazz and the ODJB, in late January 1917, resulted in two tracks that were dismissed as unusable by Columbia executives. It is interesting to speculate as to why these sides were rejected. Perhaps the band was unprepared for the session, and played at a sub-par musical level. It is also quite possible the executives at Columbia were unprepared for the music they heard, and decided the barnyard sounds and swoops and musical hollers were too risky. In any case, the following month the ODJB returned to the studio, and made history when they recorded “Livery Stable Blues” and “Dixie Jass Band One Step” for Victor Records. Following its release on March 7, 1917, “Livery Stable Blues” immediately became a smash hit, quickly selling approximately 250,000 copies. There was no longer any question as to the sales potential of this new, exciting, rhythmically-charged music. Before long record companies sought other bands who played in a similar style: The Louisiana Five, The New Orleans Rhythm Kings, and The Original New Orleans Jazz Band all made records in the months and years following the ODJB’s first recording sessions. The ODJB had sparked a jazz fad that swept across the country. The excitement generated would soon spread over seas. In 1919 the ODJB became the first jazz band to perform in Europe and introduced live jazz to England. The Influence of the Black Jazz Bands It is a significant irony that the first jazz band to record and become famous was a white group. To make matters worse, the ODJB’s leader Nick LaRocca often stated that his band had invented jazz, and that black musicians had nothing to do with it. The first black jazz band to record was a group led by trombonist Kid Ory. His group was active in New Orleans from 1912 to 1919. After moving to Los Angeles in 1919, Ory met up with another transplanted New Orleans musician, trumpeter Mutt Carey, and in 1922 they recorded his most famous number “Ory’s Creole Trombone." This recording demonstrates a considerable difference in style from the ODJB, especially the notable absence of novelty instrumental effects.
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