However approaches that look at levels of rainfall rather than growth in

However approaches that look at levels of rainfall

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broadly held grievances. However, approaches that look at levels of rainfall, rather than growth in rainfall from year to year, find tenuous, or in fact positive relationships, between rainfall abundance and the onset of conflict (Burke et al., 2009; Buhaug, 2010; Hendrix and Salehyan, 2010; Ciccone, forthcoming). Some case-based research, however, links drought to conflict – though mediated by the government’s response to the crisis. For example, during the Tuareg rebellion in northern Mali, drought – aggravated by the government’s embezzlement of drought relief supplies and food aid – was a significant source of grievance that motivated young men and women to take up arms (Benjaminsen, 2008). Recently, warmer temperatures have been linked to an increase in civil conflict, though this finding has been challenged (Burke et al., 2009; Buhaug, 2010). Civil war is also more likely in the aftermath of quick- onset natural disasters, such as earthquakes, major volcanic eruptions, floods, and cyclonic storms (Brancati, 2007; Nel and Righarts, 2008). The relationship between disaster and conflict is strongest in countries with high levels of inequality and slow economic growth; food insecurity and resource scarcity are among the more plausible explanations for this correlation. Interstate War The links between food insecurity and interstate war are less direct. While countries often go to war over territory, previous research has not focused directly on access to food or productive agricultural land as a major driver of conflict (Hensel, 2000). However, wars have been waged to reduce demographic pressures arising from the scarcity of arable land, the clearest examples being the move to acquire Lebensraum (“living space”) that motivated Nazi Germany’s aggression toward Poland and Eastern Europe (Hillgruber, 1981) and Japan’s invasion of China and Indochina (Natsios and Doley, 2009). Water, for drinking and for agriculture, is also a cause of conflict (Klare, 2002). Countries that share river basins are more likely to go to war than are other countries that border one another (Toset et al., 2000; Gleditsch et al., 2006). This relationship is strongest in countries with low levels of economic development. Institutions that manage conflicts over water and monitor and enforce agreements can significantly reduce the risk of war (Postel and Wolf, 2001).
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Solvency
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1AC—Solvency Plan: The United States Federal Government should increase access and availability of year-round visas for lower-skilled workers. The plan stabilizes labor shortages and eliminates bureaucratic visa hurdles Anderson 15 . (Forbes Correspondent, More Work Visas, Less Illegal Immigration, ) So far in the presidential campaign we’ve heard a lot about building walls and pregnant Mexican women. What we haven’t heard is an answer to this question: Why do people enter America illegally rather than wait in line? The answer: There is no line for workers seeking lower-skilled jobs.
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