Released in 1957 The Curse of Frankenstein was shown to a public not yet fully

Released in 1957 the curse of frankenstein was shown

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 6 pages.

with quick, yet crude movements (Shelley 281). Released in 1957, The Curse of Frankenstein was shown to a public not yet fully immersed in the Frankenstein craze. Hence, the film’s director primarily sought to unveil an abominable new beast to the many who had not yet seen it. A half-century after the release of The Curse of Frankenstein , however, filmmakers found a completely new form for the monster, one far more aesthetically pleasing. In the 2014 film I, Frankenstein , the monster becomes a square-jawed, roughly-featured-yet-handsome, six-pack touting martial artist who moves with the swiftness and grace of a warrior monk (I, Frankenstein). Although both monsters stay somewhat true to the text, as both possess rugged facial features and nimble strides, the massive contrast between them is evidence of the vastly different mental portraits that arise from the novel’s unclear illustration of the monster’s
Image of page 3
Zhuo 4 appearance. Nevertheless, not every factor that makes Frankenstein so adaptable leads to accurate adaptations of the novel. The monster’s constant feelings of loneliness and rejection, perhaps the most memorable elements of Frankenstein , urge readers to change the monster’s fate, granting him the companionship he so desires. In the novel, Frankenstein’s monster depressingly announces that the “enemy of God (Satan) has friends and associates … [yet] I am quite alone” (Shelley 160). Although he “radiates love and humanity”, the monster is “damned to the hell of those who cannot be loved”, failing to find a single sentient being who is not terrified of him, yet Satan, the ruler of Hell and the very embodiment of malice, finds himself surrounded by allies and companions (Shelley 458, 460). The monster’s reward for his good nature is a life of solitude, while Satan’s punishment for his war against God is ruling over a kingdom of loyal subjects and friends. The monster’s fate seems quite unfair, and therefore, it draws incredible sympathy for the monster, as all humans have experienced brief periods of loneliness, and those who read the monster’s story can feel only pity when they attempt to comprehend the horrific feeling of going through life without any friendships. Thus, filmmakers, the few people who possess the tools needed to alter the monster’s disheartening tale, have certainly felt compelled to do so. The monster finds his match in the film Young Frankenstein . Elizabeth, the fiancée of Frankenstein, falls in love with Frankenstein’s monster and becomes a “beauty to [the Monster’s] beast” (Shelley 459). The monster finds not only companionship, but also love, as he is desired, rather
Image of page 4
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 6 pages?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture