5 those who enter retail premises are called business

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Business Law Today, Standard: Text & Summarized Cases
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Chapter 26 / Exercise 1
Business Law Today, Standard: Text & Summarized Cases
Jentz/Miller
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5. Those who enter retail premises are called business . Storeowners must warn business invitees of risks. A landowner has a duty to discover and remove any dangers to customers or other invitees. When risks are , owners need not warn of them. Fill in the blanks with words that would best complete the passage. breached obvious unlikely hidden standard enforceable invitees foreseeable
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Business Law Today, Standard: Text & Summarized Cases
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Chapter 26 / Exercise 1
Business Law Today, Standard: Text & Summarized Cases
Jentz/Miller
Expert Verified
6. An attorney’s conduct is judged by the reasonable person standard.
7. Which of the following questions does a court NOT ask to determine whether the requirement of causation is met?
8. You accidentally bump into someone on the sidewalk and that person falls but is unharmed. Nonetheless, that person usually can successfully sue you for damages.
9. Assumption of risk does NOT require: a. knowledge of the risk. b. seeking out the riskiest activities. c. voluntary assumption of the risk.
10. An intervening event that acts as a superseding (overriding) cause may relieve the defendant of liability for injuries caused by the intervening event.
A theory in tort law under which the liability for injuries resulting from negligent acts is shared by all parties who were
negligent (including the injured party), on the basis of each person’s proportionate negligence.
Comparative negligence A theory in tort law under which a complaining party’s own negligence contributed to or caused his or her injuries. No matter how insignificant the plaintiff’s negligence was relative to the defendant’s negligence, the plaintiff is precluded from recovering any damages. 12. Under the doctrine of res ipsa loquitur , the defendant has the burden to prove that she or he was not negligent.

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