1 what does this cartoon imply about privacy during

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Business Law: Text and Cases
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Chapter 24 / Exercise 07
Business Law: Text and Cases
Clarkson/Miller
Expert Verified
1. What does this cartoon imply about privacy during President Nixon’s term in office? 2. What building has been transformed into a giant tape recorder? SEE SKILLBUILDER HANDBOOK, PAGE R24. Background Although historians sued for access to thousands of hours of tapes, it was not until some 21 years later, in 1996, that an agreement was made for over 3,700 hours of tape to be made public. AUTH copyright © Philadelphia Inquirer. Reprinted with permission of Universal Press Syndicate. All rights reserved. The original Nixon White House tape recorder and tape from the 1970s. p1008-1013aspe0932s2 10/17/02 9:26 AM Page 1012
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Business Law: Text and Cases
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Chapter 24 / Exercise 07
Business Law: Text and Cases
Clarkson/Miller
Expert Verified
An Age of Limits 1013 impeachment Watergate H. R. Haldeman John Ehrlichman John Mitchell Committee to Reelect the President John Sirica Saturday Night Massacre 1. TERMS & NAMES For each term or name, write a sentence explaining its significance. MAIN IDEA 2. TAKING NOTES Use a time line like the one below to trace the events of the Watergate scandal. Which event made Nixon's downfall certain? CRITICAL THINKING 3. HYPOTHESIZING If Nixon had admitted to and apologized for the Watergate break- in, how might subsequent events have been different? Explain. Think About: the extent of the cover-up the impact of the cover-up Nixon’s public image 4. ANALYZING EVENTS How did the Watergate scandal create a constitutional crisis? 5. EVALUATING Do you think that Nixon would have been forced to resign if the tapes had not existed? Explain your answer. event event event event June 1972 August 1974 On August 5, Nixon released the tapes. They contained many gaps, and one tape revealed a disturbing 18 1 / 2 -minute gap. According to the White House, Rose Mary Woods, President Nixon’s secretary, accidentally erased part of a conversation between H. R. Haldeman and Nixon. More importantly, a tape dated June 23, 1972—six days after the Watergate break-in— that contained a conversation between Nixon and Haldeman, disclosed the evidence investi- gators needed. Not only had the president known about his administration’s role in the burglary, he had agreed to the plan to cover up and obstruct the FBI’s investigation. The evidence now seemed overwhelming. On August 8, 1974, before the full House vote on the articles of impeachment began, President Nixon announced his resignation from office. Defiant as always, Nixon admitted no guilt. He merely said that some of his judgments “were wrong.” The next day, Nixon and his wife, Pat, returned home to California. A short time later, Gerald Ford was sworn in as the 38th president of the United States. THE EFFECTS OF WATERGATE The effects of Watergate have endured long after Nixon’s resignation. Eventually, 25 members of the Nixon Administration were convicted and served prison terms for crimes connected to Watergate. Along with the divisive war in Vietnam, Watergate produced a deep disillusionment with the “imperial” presidency. In the years following Vietnam and Watergate, the American public and the media devel-

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