Steingraber uses ethos and a narrative in her

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Steingraber uses ethos and a narrative in her introduction to hook the audience into her main points. However, the narrative she uses has nothing to do with the environmental crisis; the overall topic of her essay. Steingraber talks about Elijah Lovejoy, an abolitionist in the
Dobberthein 2 early 1800’s. She discusses Lovejoy to bring awareness between the similarities of the slavery crisis and the new crisis of today. While she does a good job of explaining the abolitionist story, she does not bring in the correlation of the environmental crisis until the last few sentences of the introduction. She says that Lovejoy spoke to the people he criticized calmly, but with determination, the same way that the concerned parents of today’s issue speak up [Stei15]. By doing this, Steingraber only confuses the audience by attaching them to a story and then completely changing the point at the end of the introduction. Steingraber provides pathos in her essay as well, but does so ineffectively. Steingraber perpetuates her issue on the parents of children growing up in this new generation. She states that all parents have concerns with the environment and how it affects their offspring while that is simply not true. She makes her claim by saying “Thoughtful but overwhelmed parents correctly perceive a disconnect between the enormity of the problem and the ability of individual acts of vigilance and self-sacrifice to fix it” [Stei15]. Most parents simply do not have the knowledge or have done enough research to make a change to the environment.

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