The examples of nevra and other conditions associated

This preview shows page 226 - 228 out of 475 pages.

The examples of nevra and other conditions associated with trauma, of menopause, and of HIV, each in their own way make clear that the challenge is to dislodge the familiar assumptions of universality made in Europe and North America about health, illness, disease, and life-cycle transitions. What appear to be the exotic anomalies associated with other parts of the world are made intelli- gible through anthropological research. At the same time the contribution of so- cial inequities, politics, and violence to the incidence of so much disease and dis- tress is brought into focus. Furthermore, the way in which biology, society, and cultural values are coproduced—how they are inseparable from one another and mutually malleable—is made abundantly clear. s u g g e s t i o n s f o r f u rt h e r r e a d i n g Hogle, Linda. 1999 . Recovering the Nation’s Body: Cultural Memory, Medicine, and the Politics of Redemption. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press. [An ethnography based in Germany about the disputes and practices associated with the procurement of body tissues and organs for therapeutic and scientific purposes.] Lindenbaum, Shirley, and Margaret Lock, eds. 1993 . Knowledge, Power, and Practice: The Anthropology of Medicine and Everyday Life. Berkeley: University of California Press. [This collection of essays covers a wide range of topics in medical anthropology, with emphasis on the relationship of power embedded in medical knowledge and practice.] Lock, Margaret. 1990 . “On Being Ethnic: The Politics of Identity Breaking and Making, or Nevra on Sunday.” Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 14 : 237 52 . [A discussion of the body as a medium for the expression of social and political inequalities.] ———. 1993 . Encounters with Aging: Mythologies of Menopause in Japan and North America. Berkeley: University of California Press. [A comprehensive ethnography of the politics m e d i c a l k n o w l e d g e a n d b o d y p o l i t i c s / 207
of female aging that also shows how the cultural construction, medicalization, and sub- jective experience of menopause differs in Japan and North America.] ———. 2001 . Twice Dead: Organ Transplants and the Reinvention of Death. Berkeley: Uni- versity of California Press. [An examination of the creation of the concept of brain- death and the contradictions and anxieties associated with the procurement of organs from brain-dead bodies in North America and Japan.] Nguyen, Vinh-Kim. 2001 . “Epidemics, Interzones, and Biosocial Changes.” In Entangled Histories, ed. Wolf Lepenies. London: St. Martin’s Press. [A discussion of globalization and the interrelationship of politics, culture, and biology in the HIV/AIDS epidemic in West Africa.] Scheper-Hughes, Nancy. 1992 . Death without Weeping: The Violence of Everyday Life in Brazil. Berkeley: University of California Press. [An exhaustive exploration of the ex- ploited existence of slum dwellers in northeast Brazil and its effect on affiliation, health, and physical survival.] Young, Allan. 1995 . The Harmony Of Illusions: Inventing Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture