In class and recitation discussion group activities

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In-class and recitation discussion, group activities, and other exercises are employed to contextualize the theories and research of written material. Assessed through recitation participation and exams. 2. Evaluate how central themes of Human Ecology are interrelated and produce complex effects (political, economic, social), in addition to unintended consequences in local, regional, national, and global contexts. Discussion of various positions concerning perceptions of population and land-use, with a focus on agriculture, as well as environmental risks and natural hazards and the role of social scientists in investigating and communicating research of human-environment relationships. Focus on issues facing the Rutgers community, New Jersey, and the US, as well as a broad international scope.
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Assessed through recitation participation, exams, film response papers, and book papers. 3. Critically assess how different scientists from the various fields associated with human ecology, as well as other individuals, such as journalists and activists, write about environmental issues from a variety of perspectives. Topics may include environmental history, industrial agriculture and food movements, indigenous movements and natural resource conflict, among many others. Readings and other forms of media: academic journals, news articles, op-eds, in-class film screenings, and one assigned full-length text. Assessed through recitation participation, film response papers, one book paper, and a group book presentation. REQUIREMENTS: There will be two non-cumulative examinations during the semester and a third during the finals period.  Exams will be given in lecture, but will be specific to recitation classes.  Dates for the two in- semester exams will be decided in class; those at a disadvantage may make other arrangements with their instructors.  Exams cover  all   assigned readings, books, films, and in-class lecture and recitation materials and employ a variety of question types.   The other requirements include a group book presentation, individual book paper, and two film papers.  Attendance and participation may count, depending upon recitation section.  Weightings of requirements, due dates, and late policy are all set in recitation.  Each recitation is bound by the rules agreed upon at the start of the semester.   If you have problems or
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