More commonly agents will feel sympathy for their

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-More commonly, agents will feel sympathy for their targets and develop an understanding of why they behave as they do -To add, sometimes going undercover may be addictive for some agents as they savor the sense of power, intrigue, excitement, and their protected with illegality. After all, their job was to enforce the law, not obey it. -Conversation and interaction with their supervisors may prevent corrupt behavior from agents because there is a bond of sensitivity, whereas if there is isolation and silence, then the failed communication may cause undercover agents to think “everything bad that happens to me comes from the good guys, and everything good comes from the bad guys” -Since lying becomes a huge part of going undercover, agents may feel confused about their identity because they have been living as another person for sometimes several months or longer -When an ideological issue deals with matters of class, age, race, ethnicity, religion, or gender, the agent must share some of these attributes in order to be credible, and this common bond increases the likelihood that the agent will understand and sympathize with the group’s (bad guys; targets) goals -Going undercover may lead to problems in relationships and even drug problems because of the criminal aspect that is involved -After they are done going undercover and have to leave the role, this is not always a relief for agents -Some agents have a difficult time adjusting to their ordinary existence -Their personality may reflect that of the role they played while undercover and it does not help when those around them treat them differently because it only perpetuates the change in identity -Some agents have had such a difficult time fitting back into routine police work after investigation was over that it came at the cost of heavy drug use, alcoholism, brawling, and the breakup of their family 5. Name: John Reading: Reader Ch 1-3 Summary: Chapter 1: Normality and abnormality is not universal. (Normal in one culture might be aberrant in another) Common practice by American Psychiatric Association: symptoms presented in patients can be categorized and enable the distinction between sane and insane o This view is: misleading, harmful and pejorative.
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o Diagnoses= view in the minds of the observers and not valid summaries of characteristics displayed by the observed 8 sane people gained secret admission to 12 different hospitals o 1 psychology grad in his 20s, 7 older and established people (3 psychologists, 1 pediatrician, 1 psychiatrist, 1 painter, 1 housewife) o Upon admission to the facilities, they continue to behave as their normal (sane) self. o Once labeled (such as being schizophrenic), patients were stuck with that label. To be discharged he is seen as schizophrenia in remission, not sane or was ever sane in the view of the hospital o Other insane patients in the facility often recognized these subjects were sane but the facilities’ staff fails to do so. Staffs biased through type 2 error §
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