Other economists are skeptical about industrial policy Even if technology

Other economists are skeptical about industrial

  • Folsom Lake College
  • ECON 304
  • Notes
  • sendemailtoknow
  • 21
  • 78% (18) 14 out of 18 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 21 pages.

Other economists are skeptical about industrial policy. Even if technology spillovers are common, the success of an  industrial policy requires that the government be able to measure the size of the spillovers from different markets.  This measurement problem is difficult at best. Moreover, without precise measurements, the political system may  end up subsidizing industries with the most political clout rather than those that yield the largest positive  externalities. Another way to deal with technology spillovers is patent protection. The patent laws protect the rights of inventors  by giving them exclusive use of their inventions for a period of time. When a firm makes a technological  breakthrough, it can patent the idea and capture much of the economic benefit for itself. The patent internalizes  the externality by giving the firm a  property right  over its invention. If other firms want to use the new technology,  they have to obtain permission from the inventing firm and pay it a royalty. Thus, the patent system gives firms a  greater incentive to engage in research and other activities that advance technology. Quick Quiz Give an example of a negative externality and a positive externality. Explain why market outcomes are inefficient in   the presence of these externalities. 10-2Public Policies Toward Externalities We have discussed why externalities lead markets to allocate resources inefficiently  but have mentioned only briefly how this inefficiency can be remedied. In practice,  both public policymakers and private individuals respond to externalities in various  ways. All of the remedies share the goal of moving the allocation of resources closer to  the social optimum. This section considers governmental solutions. As a general matter, the government  can respond to externalities in one of two ways.  Command-and-control policies  regulate  behavior directly.  Market-based policies provide incentives so that private decision  makers will choose to solve the problem on their own. 10-2a Command-And-Control Policies: Regulation The government can remedy an externality by making certain behaviors either  required or forbidden. For example, it is a crime to dump poisonous chemicals into the  water supply. In this case, the external costs to society far exceed the benefits to the  polluter. The government therefore institutes a command-and-control policy that  prohibits this act altogether.
Image of page 9
In most cases of pollution, however, the situation is not this simple. Despite the stated  goals of some environmentalists, it would be impossible to prohibit all polluting  activity. For example, virtually all forms of transportation—even the horse—produce 
Image of page 10
Image of page 11

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture