in children and adolescents with mental retardation Pediatrics 1186 1860 1866

In children and adolescents with mental retardation

This preview shows page 28 - 31 out of 76 pages.

in children  and adolescents with mental retardation. Pediatrics, 118(6), 1860- 1866.  doi:10.1542/peds.2005-3101 Fombonne, E. (2009). Epidemiology of pervasive developmental  disorders. Pediatric  Research, 65(6), 591-598. doi:10.1203/PDR.0b013e31819e7203 Lopata, C., Toomey, J.A., Fox, J.D., Thomeer, M.L., Volker, M.A., &  Lee, G.K. (2013). Prevalence and predictors of psychotropic use in children with high- functioning  ASDs. Autism Research and Treatment, 2013, 1-6.  Sung, M., Fung, D.S., Cai, Y., & Ooi, Y.P. (2010). Pharmacological  management in 
children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder.  Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 44, 410-428. doi:  10.3109/00048670903493330 The Learning Tree, Inc. (2014). Retrieved from - tree.org Autism: Seeing Through Their Eyes 1578 words 7 pages Autism occurs at many different ages and it is important to know the  causes, effects, and solutions of this disorder. Autism is a persuasive  developmental disorder (PDD). It causes delays in the development of  basic skills (Autism Spectrum). Symptoms of this disorder are usually  shown before the age of three. The symptoms range from mild to  disabling severity (Autism Spectrum). Autism affects 1 in 88 children  and 1 in 54 boys. The rate of children with this disorder is growing.  More children have been diagnosed this year than those with diabetes,  AIDS, etc. It is the fastest growing developmental disorder (Autism  Speaks). There are ways to figure out when a child has autism and  exactly how severe or mild it is. This is figured out by screening tests.  Screening tests focus on three major statistical concepts: sensitivity,  specifity, and PVV. These tests are not possible without the knowledge  of these concepts (Benaron 32). At one point in time autism was  considered to be a form of schizophrenia. By the 1960s it was finally  classified as its own disorder (Freedman 10). However, in 1967, 
“infantile autism” was recognized as a disorder but still classified as  schizophrenia (Freedman 12). Swiss psychiatrist, Ernst Bleuler,  introduced the word “autistic” in 1909. However, he did not use it in the  context it is used today (Benaron 3). Two people, Kanner and  Asperger, were the first to use it I the concept it is used in today  ( Benaron 3). Now, severe autism is also known as Kanner’s  Syndrome. It can also be called infantile autism (Shore PG). There are  people with higher scale autism and those with lower scale autism.  People with higher scale autism are known to have “low functioning”  autism, while those with lower scale autism have “ high functioning”  autism (Shore PG).

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture