Findings Tensions and inconsistencies at macro and meso levels impact on

Findings tensions and inconsistencies at macro and

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Findings Tensions and inconsistencies at macro and meso levels impact on diversity management at a micro level. The authors demonstrate how power and context are intertwined in the biopolitical positioning of subjects in terms of gender and indigeneity. The contested legacy of indigenous-colonial relations and societal gender dynamics are played out in a case from the accounting profession. Research limitations/implications Within critical diversity studies context and power are linked in a reciprocal relationship; analysis of both is mandatory to strengthen theory and practice. The multi- level analytical framework provides a useful tool to understand advances and lack of progress for diversity groups within specific organizations. Originality/value While many diversity scholars agree that the analysis of context is important, hitherto its application has been vague. The authors conduct a multi-level analysis of context, connecting the power dynamics between the levels. The authors draw out implications within one profession in a specific country socio-politics. Multi-level analyses of context and power have the potential to enhance the theory and practice of diversity management. Keywords Gender, Context, M ā ori, Diversity management, Multi-level analysis, Aotearoa New Zealand Paper type Research paper Introduction A core feature of contemporary diversity studies is attention to ongoing contextual processes (Zanoni et al. , 2010). In this paper we engage directly with the challenge of how context matters in terms of power. As Ahonen et al. (2014, p. 264) argue persuasively context is not a variable or background , but a complex array of power relations, discursive practices and forms of knowledge that need to be analysed . These power relations need to be taken into account to better understand the ambiguities of implementing workplace diversity within local contexts. We situate our work within critical diversity studies by demonstrating how the historical and socio-political contexts may be operationalized using the setting of Aotearoa New Zealand. While other country contexts have been analysed in diversity research (e.g. Ozbilgin and Tatli, 2008; Klarsfeld 2010), the link between country context and the intergroup power dynamics is often broadly sketched. Within this paper we aim to analyse how context and power are intertwined and explore tensions and inconsistencies that can arise in local diversity management discourses for two groups: women and indigenous M ā ori. Scholars have called for multi-level diversity studies (Pringle, 2009a; Zanoni et al. , 2010) arguing that diversity practices are shaped by the historical, social organizational Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal Vol. 34 No. 6, 2015 pp. 470-482 © Emerald Group Publishing Limited 2040-7149 DOI 10.1108/EDI-05-2015-0031 Received 20 August 2014 Revised 15 June 2015 Accepted 21 June 2015 The current issue and full text archive of this journal is available on Emerald Insight at: / 2040-7149.htm 470 EDI 34,6 Downloaded by UNIVERSITI TEKNOLOGI MALAYSIA At 19:27 23 December 2016 (PT)
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factors and the interactions among them. As Syed and Ozbilgin (2009, p. 2436) suggest,
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