Types of water in pai 210 there are three different

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Types of Water in PAI 2.10 There are three different types of water in the lab. Use the appropriate water for the experiment or task you are to perform. It matters!!! 1. Tap water: undistilled water from the faucet. It is hot or cold. 2. Distilled water: water from the sink with the three large Evoqua tanks on top. The outlet has a white knob. This water has been treated by reverse osmosis to remove inorganic salts. 3. MilliQ or Mega-ohm water: This water is stored in a clearly labeled large carboy Nalgene container and maintained by the instructors of this lab. It is produced by passing distilled water through deionizing and ultra filters. Material Waste Disposal First, determine the type of waste you have for disposal. The waste may be biological, chemical, glassware, or sharps. Is it Biological Waste ? If so, follow the guidelines below depending if it is liquid or solid. Liquid Biological Waste: includes liquid cultures or liquid waste potentially contaminated with fungi or bacteria.
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Disposal Method : Decontaminate by treating with an appropriate disinfectant (10% bleach). The amount of contact time should be >10 minutes. The amount of contact time may vary and exceptions will be noted. Once the waste is decontaminated, it may be poured down the drain with running water flushing the waste. Solid Biological Waste: are solids that contain biohazardous materials or lab waste that has come in contact with biohazardous materials. These include: Culture media Personal Protective Equipment (contaminated) Plastic ware including pipette tips Transgenic plants including soil Disposal Methods: Place material in an autoclave bag (Figure 1). The bag is usually in a brown cardboard "trashcan" box. Do NOT put any liquid waste in the solid waste bag or it will start to smell bad. If the bag is getting 3/4 full please notify the DIY staff and we will contact EHS to pick up the waste. Figure 1: Autoclave bag Is it Chemical waste ? The University of Texas E, H,&S department removes regulated or potentially regulated chemical waste from University facilities. The types of waste include laboratory reagents, spent solvents, batteries, and used oil.
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In this lab, we will be dealing with primarily two waste streams that will fall into the chemical waste category. One waste stream will be spent solvents. These will be flammable or halogenated solvents. The flammable and halogenated solvents will typically be generated in small quantities and disposed of in a designated carboy. Solvents that are not flammable, do not contain halogens and are soluble in water, may be washed down the sink (this includes buffers, salts and diluted acids and bases). The other waste stream we will encounter is ethidium bromide, which will be generated as a liquid or solid when we perform DNA analysis.
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  • Winter '15
  • bobby
  • Hazardous waste, Waste, hazardous waste management, carboy

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