Hypothesis example question i wonder whether self

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Hypothesis Example Question I wonder whether self-esteem has anything to do with depression? Hypothesis “People with low self-esteem will score higher on a depression test”
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1/2/18 15 The Scientific Method 3. Research and Observations You do the research Collect your observations Analyze the results Results inform the revision of a theory or generation of a new theory based on what is learned “Rats find Oreos as addictive as cocaine — an unusual college research project” The Scientific Method Eliminating bias from reporting results Psychologists use operational [standard] definitions Allows for replication (being able to repeat experiment and find same results)
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1/2/18 16 Scientific Writing Objective Writing Good example: Slugs are typically found in moist environment Bad example: Slugs are typically found in moist environments, and I think hey are disgusting to look at. It is okay to use pronouns like “I” and “We” to describe the procedure of a study but not so much when describing the interpretation or results. Scientific Writing Avoid using “I think..” or YOUR own preferences Instead you can reference a theory and research studies to back up your ideas Bad: I think hair loss in men is caused by being married too long. Good: “Based on previous studies, length of marriage correlates with hair loss in men” Important not to introduce bias when reporting findings Experimenter bias can also happen at any level
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1/2/18 17 What is this? What is this?
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1/2/18 18 What is this? What is this?
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1/2/18 19 Research Methods 1. Descriptive 2. Correlational 3. Experimentation Research Methods: Descriptive 1. Descriptive: observing and describing behavior CASE STUDY SURVEY NATURALISTIC OBSERVATION
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1/2/18 20 Research Methods: Descriptive CASE STUDY EXAMINING ONE INDIVIDUAL AT GREAT DEPTH Common in medical studies or animals with special skills Not good to make generalizations from one subject Case of Genie, Wikipedia Research Methods: Descriptive CASE STUDY: Genie Child born in Arcadia, CA 1957 to abusive parents Was kept locked up in a room until age 13 Deprived of social interactions As a result did not acquire language during childhood Once rescued, testing revealed there was no neurological explanation for her lack of language Concluded social and language deprivation lead to lack of language Later in life developed a few words and was able to use sign language Case of Genie, Wikipedia
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1/2/18 21 Research Methods: Descriptive SURVEY Looks at many cases in less depth and asks people to report behavior or opinions (e.g. a questionnaire about attitudes on animal cruelty). Wording effects: need to be weary of how questions are worded so as not to lead people to answer in a certain way Random Sampling: choosing every person in such a way that every person in the group has an equal change of being picked – can say sample represents the population Research Methods: Descriptive Naturalistic Observation Watching and recording behavior in naturally occurring situations without interfering.
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