To begin piercys analysis of womens oppression and

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To begin, Piercy’s analysis of women’s oppression and how she goes about creating a better, more equitable society revolves around the main theme, liberation of women to become fuller members of society. Piercy portrays once females are not obligated to give birth and raise children, they’re given a chance at living in an equitable society through Luciente’s world. Women in the future were able to share responsibilities with men, for example, working, family, and social obligations that were shared equally amongst genders, reassuring the society that everyone should work together to obtain a well-rounded community. In the future world women have power, dominance, and a voice instead of being the less superior gender in a world run by men. In the future society Connie observes babies being born through brooders, along with three individuals raising the child willingly. The system in this society empowers all genders by allowing women, trans, binary and queer individuals to have equal freedom as men and allowing men to be “ loving and tender”(Piercy, pg.127). This was a huge change from Connie's society because in her world men were expected to be “strong, hold his liquor, and beat other men”, whereas, in the future world men do not have expectations to act masculine, and they were able to be “mothers” which portrays an important analysis of oppression in Piercy’s novel of a better, equitable society, in terms of family and reproduction. Skin colour and race has also become detached from cultures to increase the population, while avoiding racism. For example, Luciente’s world is increasing the quantity of black and huspanic genes through various populations, but consider race and colour as entirely aesthetic. In Lucinente’s society Piercy envisions social change. In the future world gender is a constitute; there is a prevailing pronoun called “per” used instead of identifying individuals
as “him” or “her”. Every individual in the society gets to choose their own name, choose their field of study and work, as well as total freedom to their mental health/emotional choices. Luciente’s character is used as a symbol of change between the past and the future in the novel. For instance, “she spoke, she moved with the air of brisk unselfconscious authority Connie associated with men”(Piercy, pg. 67). Connie mistakes Luciente for a man at first, until she realizes she goes by the term “queer” and how women are not treated any less than men in the future. In Luciente’s world class, race, sexuality and reproduction are not divided by most superior to less superior, but equality. The frustration and the essential negations of the status quo of a devoted feminist are clear in her views of Connie’s world and in Piercy’s explications of an advanced social order. Connie’s world is a conspectus of the personal and public oppressions of a minority woman. It is an environment impacted by poverty, and dependent by men. However, in Connie’s world in the beginning of the novel we are introduced to sexuality and violence which we do not see in Luciente’s world. When Connie

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