The Fourteenth Amendment did not grand blacks the right to vote The

The fourteenth amendment did not grand blacks the

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 5 pages.

The Fourteenth Amendment did not grand blacks the right to vote.The Reconstruction ActJohnson campaigned against the Fourteenth Amendment in the 1866 midterm elections.In March 1867, over Johnson's veto, Congress adopted the Reconstruction Act, which:oDivided the South into five military districts.oCalled for creation of new southern state governments, with black men given the vote.The Reconstruction Act thus began Radical Reconstruction, which lasted until 1877.Impeachment and the Election of GrantTo demonstrate his dislike for the Tenure of Office Act, Johnson removed the secretary of war from office in 1868.Johnson was impeached and the Senate fell one vote short from removing him from office.The Fifteenth AmendmentUlysses S. Grant won the 1868 presidential election.The Fifteenth Amendment was ratified in 1870.It prohibited federal and state governments from denying any citizen the right to vote because ofrace.The Fifteenth Amendment did not extend suffrage to women.The "Great Constitutional Revolution"The laws and amendments of Reconstruction reflected the intersection of two products of the Civil War era: a newly empowered national state and the idea of a national citizenry enjoying equality before the law.Before the Civil War, American citizenship had been closely linked to race.The new amendments also transformed the relationship between the federal government and the states.The Rights of WomenThe destruction of slavery led feminists to search for ways to make the promise of free labor realfor women.Some feminists, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, opposed the Fifteenth Amendment because it did not enfranchise women.The divisions among feminists led to the creation of two hostile women's rights organizations that would not reunite until the 1890s.Despite their limitations, the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments and the Reconstruction Act of 1867 marked a radical departure in American and world history.Radical Reconstruction in the South"The Tocsin of Freedom"Among the former slaves, the passage of the Reconstruction Act inspired an outburst of political organization.Blacks used direct action to remedy long-standing grievances.The Union League aided blacks in the public sphere.By 1870, the Union had been restored and southern states had Republican majorities.The Black OfficeholderTwo thousand African-Americans occupied public offices during Reconstruction.Fourteen blacks were elected to the US House of Representatives.
Background image
Two blacks were elected to the US Senate.Carpetbaggers and ScalawagsCarpetbaggers were northern-born white Republicans who made their homes in the South after the war, with many holding political office.
Background image
Image of page 5

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 5 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • SARABOSTELMANN
  • US History, Reconstruction, Southern United States, Ulysses S. Grant, Reconstruction era of the United States, free labor, reconstruction act

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture