If we select a particular level it tells us over here

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settings, which is the default, and at the bottom we have the least secure settings which is probably not a good idea to use. If we select a particular level it tells us over here on the right what that will do. The default always notify setting for example will always notify you as the end user when an application tries to install software or make changes to the computer. Or if you try to make changes to Windows settings. If you crank it down a notch then it will notify you but will not dim your desktopwhen either of those two things happen. When set to always notify, the screen will be dimmed and you will not be allowed to do anything else until you decide either yes or no whether or not you want to elevate privileges or not. If we crank it down a notch it still will notify you but it will not dim the desktop. Which means you can still do other things. If the desktop is dimmed, as in the always notify settings, then there is nothing else you can do until you either confirm or deny the elevation in privileges. Here you will be notified but you can still go do other things if you wanted to. We can crank it down one more notch in which case it will notify you only when apps try to make changes to the computer and the desktop will not be dimmed. It will not notify you if you yourself try to make changes to Windows settings. Notice down here it says it's really not a good idea. You really should only use this option if for some reason it's taking a long time to dim the desktop on your computer. If you're using decent hardware it doesn't take very long and it's not worth the security risk frankly. Or you can come down here to never notify in which case you will not be notified when apps try to install software and make changes to the computer, or if you try to make changes to Windows settings. Not recommended. Bad idea. I always leave my systems right up here. Yes it's a pain to have to elevate privileges to do certain tasks on the system, but the increase in security is worth it. Summary 12:17-12:44
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That's it for this demonstration. In this demo, we talked about how to use user account control. We first looked at what user account control is. And then we ran through several scenarios where we tried to install an application as administrative user. And we tried to make system changes then as a standard user. And we compared the difference in how privileges are elevated in those two different scenarios. And then we talked about how to run commands from the command prompt as an administrative user. And then we ended this demonstration by talking about how to set user account control settings. User Account Control (UAC) helps minimize the dangers of unwanted actions or unintended software installations. UAC prompts for permission before allowing changes that can affect your computer's security or performance. How UAC works depends on the user account type: A standard user account is an account that has the least amount of user rights and privileges required to perform most basic tasks. An administrator account can perform any action on the system.
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