Fault handlers specific catch handlers and a catchAll handler Compensation

Fault handlers specific catch handlers and a catchall

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Fault handlers, specific catch handlers, and a catchAll handler Compensation handlers Message handlers Alarm handlers For example, an exception handled within a scope may not be visible to an enclosing scope if the handler can manage the error gracefully; otherwise, the scope exception handler can perform some activities and propagate the exception to its enclosing scope. The slide shows the creation of a scope, expanding the Scope activity, highlighting the locations where the variables, partner links, and handler items can be added to the scope, and dragging new activities from the Component palette to the scope.
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Oracle SOA Suite 11 g : Essential Concepts 8 - 15 Copyright © 2009, Oracle. All rights reserved. Adding Activities to a Scope Activities can be added to a scope from: The Component palette The BPEL diagram 1 2 Adding Activities to a Scope The slide shows the steps to add activities to the Scope activity. After dragging a Scope activity into the BPEL Diagram: 1. Click the plus sign (+) icon to expand the Scope activity. 2. Drag another activity, such as the Assign activity, from the Component palette into the body of the scope. Alternatively, select and drag existing activities within the BPEL process diagram to the Scope activity.
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Oracle SOA Suite 11 g : Essential Concepts 8 - 16 Copyright © 2009, Oracle. All rights reserved. Communicating Data with a BPEL Process Request and response messages: Have XML message structures Are defined by XML schema elements BPEL variables are: Defined as a message type in a process Scope activity Used to store XML data shared between activities and exchanged between services XML schema Client Defines Request Response BPEL process BPEL process (main scope) inputVariable <assign> creditCheckVar Communicating Data with a BPEL Process A client or service communicating with a BPEL process must agree upon the structure of the data being exchanged between them. Message structures are defined in WSDL, which derive the message type from XML elements defined in an XML schema. When a BPEL process is created, it contains a default Scope activity called main . A BPEL scope contains a sequence of activities and can have other scope activities nested within it. A scope may define one or more BPEL variables. The variables store message data that is shared among BPEL process activities and exchanged with other services. Activities can use a BPEL variable that is within their own scope or the scope of their parents. Similar to variables in programming languages, a BPEL variable is defined by a WSDL message type whose structure is expressed as an XML element from an XML schema. The XML schema may be embedded or imported in the WSDL defining the message types. The slide shows a client sending a request message defined by an XML schema element to a BPEL process and receiving an XML response also defined by an XML schema element. The BPEL process stores the request message data in a BPEL variable defined with the same message type. The BPEL process shows an example of sharing XML data inside a BPEL process
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