observation has served as the ba s i s Yet there are many theories as to how

Observation has served as the ba s i s yet there are

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observation has served as the ba s i s. Yet there are many theories as to how the process takes place. One widely accepted theory proposes a five step sequence. 2 1 . Exposure. Information processing starts with the exposure of consumers to some so urce of stimulation suc h as watching television , going to the super mar ket, or receiving direct mail advertisements at home . In order to start the process, mar- keter~ must attract consumers to t he stimulus or put it squarely in the path of peo- ple in t he target m "rke t. 2. Attention . Exposure alone does little unless peopie pay attention to the s timulus . At aJ1Y moment, people are bombarded by all sorts of stimuli, but they have a lim- ited capacity to process this input. They must devote mental resources to stimuli in order to process them; in other words, they must pay attention. lVlarketers can increase t he likelihood of attention by providing inforrrational cues that are rel- evant to the buyer. 3 . Perception . Perception involves classifying the incoming signals into meaningful categories, forming patte,ns, and assigning names or images to them. Perception i s the assignment of meaning to stimuli received through the senses. (More will be said about perception later.) 4. Retention. Storage of information for later reference, or retention, is the fourth step of the information-processing sequence. Actually, the role of retention or mem- ory in the seq uence is t wofold. First, memory holds information while it is being processed throJghout the sequence. Second, memory stores information for future, lon g -term use. H e avy repetition and Dutting a message to music are two things marketers do to erhance retention. 5. Retri eva l and Application. The process by which information is recovered from the memory s to re house i:. called retrieval . Application is putting that information INTEGRATED MARKETING KIDS ARE HOOKED ONLINE These days, practically even the tiniest of tykes is tech-savvy. And it's no wonder. There are computers in e lementary schools, computer games, and, of course, there is educational software. Kids spend a lot of time online, not just at school, but also at home, for social interaction and entertainment. According to market researcher Teen Research Unlimited, 62% of teenagers say they log on at hom e for 4.2 hours a we~k, while 46% spend 2.3 hours a week using a computer outside the home. Teens say they spend most of their online time doing research (72%), sending and reading email (63%), playing games (28 %), and checking out things to buy or making pur- chases (23%). ' Internet consultancy Cyber Dialogue Data reveals the num- ber of teenagers going online at least once a month grew by nearly 270% between 1998 and 1999. That frequency, cou- pled with the fact that 19 % of these kids have a credit card in hi s or her own name and 9% have access to a parent's card to shop online, adds up to a hug e customer base for Internet marketers.
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