Barometric pressure atmospheric pressure as indicated

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( www.google.com/dictionary ) Barometric pressure : atmospheric pressure as indicated by a barometer. (wordnetweb.princeton.edu/perl/webwn) Data: (look at attached excel sheet) Analysis: (look at attached excel sheet) Results and Conclusion: This lab was executed to help the students know and understand the speed of sound in air by the resonance in a pipe closed at one end. We were able to reach within a good distance of the accepted value of the speed of sound waves, which was 343.6 m/s. Our resulting percent discrepancies were 1.95%, 6.72%, and 4.03%, which is not bad at all. Possible discrepancies in our data is not being able
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to hear the lowest pitch in order to know when an audible increase in intensity of the sound occurs, wrong calculations, rushing the experiment, and approximating the height of water. Questions: 1. Are the airwaves in the pipe “longitudinal” or “transverse”? Do the air molecules vibrate parallel or perpendicular to the pipe length? Are these vibrations of constant amplitude along the pipe length? (Briefly describe) Answer: The airwaves in the pipe are longitudinal and the molecules vibrate parallel to the pipe length. These vibrations are of constant amplitude along the pipe length. 2. Explain the physical significance of the “end correction.” Did the experimental value for the wavelength depend on the end correction? Why? Answer : The end correction is the difference between the frequency of the tuning fork and the corresponding sound waves in the tube caused by the space from the tuning for to the opening of the tube. The experimental value of wavelength we found did not account for the end correction because we managed to make it a very minor distance. 3. Will the speed of sound change with barometric pressure (P 0 ), if the temperature remains constant? Explain with reference to the equation: V= Answer: The speed of sound would not change because the way to change (P 0 ) would be to increase temperature, but our temperature is constant so (P 0 ) would not be affected. 4. The velocity of sound as computed in step 6 above appears to be independent of the diameter of the tube used. Would you expect this to be true if you had thought about it previously? Under what conditions would you expect the velocity of sound in a pipe to depend upon the diameter of the pipe? Answer: I would expect this to be true because the diameter of the tube does not seem like it should affect the speed of sound. There aren’t any conditions that would make the diameter affect the speed of sound.
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