LIN200 Week 15 Day 2+ - final exam review

Heterosexual masculinity resistance against

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- heterosexual masculinity - resistance against mainstream White culture
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What is Chicano English? Chicano English is a dialect of English spoken mainly by people of Mexican descent in the US Other people of Latin American background may speak Chicano English or other dialects with similar features Speakers of Chicano English sometimes speak Spanish However, not all of them do! Many speakers of Chicano English are monolingual English speakers.
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Is Chicano English like Spanish? Because of its origins, Chicano English does have many features, especially in the phonology that show the influence of Spanish. For example, the ‘a’ sound in words like pa sta or sa w sounds much more like the Spanish “a” than in other dialects of English. In endings like going or talking , Chicano English speakers tend to have a higher vowel, more like ‘i’ of Spanish (as in si ), so that the words end up sounding more like ‘goween’ and ‘talkeen’. The ‘l’ in Chicano English is sometimes ‘light’, which is also more similar to how it is pronounced in Spanish.
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What is Spanglish? Another mistaken idea that people have about Chicano English is that it is the same thing as ' Spanglish '. It means mixing English and Spanish in the same sentence. Linguists have a more technical term for this; we call it CODE-SWITCHING . And it can be between any two languages, not just English and Spanish. People tend to have a lot of mistaken ideas about this kind of mixing. Often, there are negative attitudes toward code-switching, and it is thought of as 'broken' or 'messed up' language.
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What is code-switching? In linguistics, code-switching is the concurrent use of more than one language, or language variety, in conversation. Multilinguals - people who speak more than one language - sometimes use elements of multiple languages in conversing with each other. Thus, code- switching is the use of more than one linguistic variety in a manner consistent with the syntax and phonology of each variety. (from wikipedia)
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What is Mock Spanish? Jane Hill, a linguistic anthropologist, coined the term Mock Spanish. Mock Spanish is the insertion of Spanish words or phrases into English using English pronunciation, and the creation of fake Spanish-like words like “correctomundo,” by Anglo-Americans, in certain contexts .
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What is Heritage Language Loss? Heritage language loss is when post-immigrant generations do not (fully) learn immigrant languages from their parents This can be because they learn imperfect versions of the heritage language Or it can be because they do not learn the heritage language at all
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What is the Melting pot vs. salad bowl metaphor?
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How many States have official English? (blue)
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What is bilingual education? There are two types of bilingual education programs: To help students with limited English language proficiency To learn English To learn other academic material while they are learning English To do this while also helping other students learn a new non-English language (usually called dual-immersion programs)
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What was the Ebonics controversy about? Is Ebonics a separate language, or “merely” a dialect of
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heterosexual masculinity resistance against mainstream...

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