several hypotheses about the relative advantages of weak and strong tie

Several hypotheses about the relative advantages of

This preview shows page 198 - 201 out of 344 pages.

several hypotheses about the relative advantages of weak and strong-tie networks and of  the intensity of any differences due to the amount of time spent online. Haythornthwaite  188
Image of page 198
suggested that the online world is particularly well-suited for maintaining weak tie  networks, and possibly not as good for maintaining strong ones. The latter is consistent  with critics who, without seeing any potential benefits from online networks, decry  Internet use as isolating. Functionally, this has appeal in that the entry and exit costs  online tend to be lower than their offline counterparts, and so the relationships that  develop may not be as bonding. Therefore: H 1 : Bridging (weak-tie) social capital will be larger online than offline. It follows that this effect should increase as time online increases, so: H 2 : Effects found in H 1  will be stronger for heavier users than lighter users. A related question explores the functional form of the expected effects, i.e. do  they take on some kind of curvilinear form? Turkle’s work with gamers suggests that  those users who spend large amounts of time online may eventually experience problems. Do light users experience moderate weak-tie gains and heavy users strong ones, but very,  very heavy users see a decrease at some point? So: R 2 : What is the functional form of bridging effects as time online increases? If the Internet is better at generating weak-tie, bridging social capital than offline  life because of its lower entry and exit costs, the offline world should be better at  generating strong-tie bonding social capital because of its relatively higher entry and exit  costs. With more to gain and more to lose from them, offline communities and  relationships should generate more emotional support than the online world. Also, as  noted in Chapter 5, the “translucence” of online social encounters is weaker than offline,  189
Image of page 199
and so should make it harder to transmit the social cues and to establish the mechanisms  of accountability that strong networks are thought to require (Erickson et al., 2002). So: H 3 : Bonding (strong-tie) social capital will be larger offline than online. But what of the fears about offline effects due to Internet activity? Kraut et al’s  first series of experiments suggested that there might be initial losses in strong social  networks offline after the introduction of the Internet into people’s lives (R. Kraut et al.,  1996). However, the second wave of studies showed that this effect had gone away (Robert Kraut et al., 2002). Still, the time displacement approach favored by Nie suggests strongly that time online must eat into “real world” strong network effects (Nie, 2001). 
Image of page 200
Image of page 201

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 344 pages?

  • Spring '17
  • stacy braiuca

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

Stuck? We have tutors online 24/7 who can help you get unstuck.
A+ icon
Ask Expert Tutors You can ask You can ask You can ask (will expire )
Answers in as fast as 15 minutes