11 Before he could get started Netscape Communications collaborated with Sun

11 before he could get started netscape

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programming language into its Netscape Navigator. [11] Before he could get started, Netscape Communications collaborated with Sun Microsystems to include in Netscape Navigator Sun's more static programming language Java , in order to compete with Microsoft for user adoption of Web technologies and platforms. [12] Netscape Communications then decided that the scripting language they wanted to create would complement Java and should have a similar syntax, which excluded adopting other languages such as Perl , Python , TCL , or Scheme. To defend the idea of JavaScript against competing proposals, the company needed a prototype. Eich wrote one in 10 days, in May 1995. Although it was developed under the name Mocha , the language was officially called LiveScript when it first shipped in beta releases of Netscape Navigator 2.0 in September 1995, but it was renamed JavaScript [2] when it was deployed in the Netscape Navigator 2.0 beta 3 in December. [13] The final choice of name caused confusion, giving the impression that the language was a spin-off of the Java programming language, and the choice has been characterized [14] as a marketing ploy by Netscape to give JavaScript the cachet of what was then the hot new Web programming language. There is a common misconception that JavaScript was influenced by an earlier Web page scripting language developed by Nombas named Cmm (not to be confused with the later C-- created in 1997). [15] [16] Brendan Eich, however, had never heard of Cmm before he created LiveScript. [17] Nombas did pitch their embedded Web page scripting to Netscape, though Web page scripting was not a new concept, as shown by the ViolaWWW Web browser. [18] Nombas later switched to offering JavaScript instead of Cmm in their ScriptEase product and was part of the TC39 group that standardized ECMAScript. [19] Server-side JavaScript [ edit ] In December 1995, soon after releasing JavaScript for browsers, Netscape introduced an implementation of the language for server-side scripting with Netscape Enterprise Server . [20] Since 1996, the IIS web-server has supported Microsoft's implementation of server-side Javascript -- JScript —in ASP and .NET pages. [21] Since the mid-2000s, additional server-side JavaScript implementations have been introduced, such as Node.js in 2009. [22] Adoption by Microsoft [ edit ] Microsoft script technologies including VBScript and JScript were released in 1996. JScript, a reverse-engineered implementation of Netscape's JavaScript, was part of Internet Explorer 3 . JScript was also available for server-side scripting in Internet Information Server . Internet Explorer 3 also included Microsoft's first support for CSS and various extensions to HTML, but in each case the implementation was noticeably different from that found in Netscape Navigator at the time. [23] [24] These differences made it difficult for designers and programmers to make a single website work well in both browsers, leading to the use of "best viewed in Netscape" and "best viewed in Internet Explorer" logos that characterized these early years of the browser wars .
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