13 How hegemons see other powerful states They seek to prevent great powers in

13 how hegemons see other powerful states they seek

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13. How hegemons see other powerful states? They seek to prevent great powers in other regions from duplicating their feat. The ideal situation for any great power is to be the only regional hegemony in the world. Regional hegemons do not want peers. Instead, they want to keep other regions divided among several great powers, so that these states will compete with each other and be unable to focus on them. *Taiwan is likely to be an important player in the anti-China balancing coalition (Taiwan controls the sea lanes in East Asia, it is hard for the US and Japan to imagine China controlling that large island). 14. Why is the China threat “inflated” ? China “increasing its ability to deliver nuclear warheads to the United States and to overwhelm missile defense systems.” That the United States may be falling behind China when it comes to weapon technology. What is actually happening is that China presently has a modest strategic force with 240 nuclear warheads which only a handful of its ballistic missiles can presently reach the US. Meanwhile the US has around 3000 nuclear warheads. China has acquired nuclear missiles, which have in turn developed massive attention towards its threat to the US. It is believed that China has about 240 nuclear warheads and only a few can actually reach the US. On the other hand, the US has about 2000 nuclear warheads with actual capability to reach China. The author places some emphasis on three specific facts: 1) Hawks are likely to use developments such as “these” (the threat of China’s nuclear capabilities) to portray China as a rising revisionist threat. However, China is building its nuclear capability in order to fit in the nuclear deterrence doctrine that the US developed during the cold war. 2) If you wanted to cap or slow Chinese nuclear modernization, the smart way to do it would be to abandon the futile pursuit of strategic missile defenses and bring China into the same negotiating framework that capped and eventually reduced the US and Russian arsenals. 3) Realize that negotiations and increasing missile defense are futile once a nation has developed a second-strike capability. Missile defenses, in order to provide such defenses must be close to perfect. If a nation were to launch 100 nuclear warheads, and the nation under attack has a defensive system that was 95% effective, 5 missiles would still reach 5 major cities. SECTION 3 1. Liberalism: Key principles (lectures) School of thought based on: - Rejection of power of politics - The need for international cooperation, economic ties, international law and shared values - The role of nonstate actors in shaping state preferences and policy choices
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Liberalism claims that international anarchy does not necessarily lead to conflict and wars. Liberalism opposes realist explanations which emphasize cost benefit analysis and state sec. Interests.
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