Source These confessions were narrated to lawyer Thomas R Gray in prison where

Source these confessions were narrated to lawyer

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Source: These confessions were narrated to lawyer Thomas R. Gray in prison where Nat Turner was held after his capture on October 30, 1831. His confessions were published on November 5, 1831 for his trial.
Document B (Modified) I am led to believe, from all that I can learn, that Nat Turner has been planning his mischief and disruption for quite some time. After pretending to be inspired to rebel by God, he made his announcement of rebellion to the Blacks. He has used every means in his power, to gain control over the minds of the slaves. A dreamer of dreams and a would-be Prophet, he used all the arts familiar to such pretenders, to trick, confuse and overwhelm the slave’s minds. Source: Editor. "The Southampton Tragedy." The Richmond Enquirer . Virginia, 27 September 1831. Document C (Modified) You had far better all die— die immediately, than live slaves, and throw your misery upon your children. However much you and all of us may desire it, there is not much hope of freedom without the shedding of blood. If you must bleed, let it all come at once--rather die freemen, than live to be slaves. The patriotic Nathaniel Turner was driven to desperation by the wrong and injustice of slavery. By force, his name has been recorded on the list of dishonor, but future generations will remember him among the noble and brave. Source: Henry Highland Garnet speech, “An Address To The Slaves Of The United States” (1843). Garnet’s speech was delivered at the National Negro Convention of 1843 held in Buffalo, New York. The convention drew 70 delegates including leaders like Frederick Douglass. Citations: Thomas Gray, The Confessions of Nat Turner: The Leader of the Late Insurrections in Southampton, Va. As Fully and Voluntarily Made to Thomas R. Gray, in the Prison Where He Was Confined, Nov. 5, 1831, For His Trial. "The Southampton Tragedy." The Richmond Enquirer. Virginia, 27 September 1831. Henry Highland Garnet, “An Address To The Slaves Of The United States” (1843).

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