5 Wheeling further argues on the culture in athletics in the following Peggy

5 wheeling further argues on the culture in athletics

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highly influenced by culture (para. 5). Wheeling further argues on the culture in athletics in the following: Peggy Sanday , an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania, found that some societies are more prone to rape than others; tribal societies with higher levels of male dominance, sex segregation, and tolerance of interpersonal violence had higher rates of rape. In other words, some environments can encourage sexual aggression. College athletics are highly sex segregated, extremely male dominated, and, at least in the
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case of some sports—football and hockey, for example—violent by design (para. 5 and 7). Susan Ladika (2017) states the following that agrees with Wheeling: Some experts say rape is particularly prevalent among those who play aggressive team sports, and that the behavior is driven by a so-called rape culture that normalizes sexual violence against women (para. 12). The culture around sports could cause a significant rise in sexual aggression toward women. The disturbing point is that the men would exhibit this behavior if they did not get in trouble. Anna Merlin, a reporter for Jezebel states the following: A small survey of college men points at something equal parts interesting and disturbing: one in three of them say they would be willing to "use force to obtain intercourse" as long as nobody would find out and there would be no consequences. But very few were willing to say they would commit rape, suggesting that they don't quite see that forced sex and rape are the same thing. (para. 1). Ed Cara, a reporter for the Medical Daily and Siobhan Freeman, a reporter for the Independent, agree with this notion that male athletes admit they raped women, but they do not think they did according to their definition of rape. The culture within athletics can entice this aggression. Because of the conquest behavior and how much women the athletes have slept with, sport is a relative safe place for sexual abusers (Kirby, 2000). The culture of objectifying women and making women as a conquest game can fuel aggression toward women. College campuses around the United States in the past decade have had sexual assault cases against athletes, and one of them is the case at Florida State University.
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On the crisp, night of December, 7, 2012, Erica Kinsman, a female student at Florida State University, went to a popular bar in Tallahassee called Potbelly’s (Bogdanich, 2014). Kinsman states the following on what happened at Potbelly’s with a fellow star quarterback for the university, Jameis Winston: A man standing at the bar saw that I was uncomfortable with this guy following me, and so he kind of like grabbed me and was like, “This is my girlfriend. Leave her alone.” And I was like, “Thank You. Like the guy left, and I was just like thank you. And he’s like “Do you wanna take a shot?” And I said, “Sure.” So I turned around, like, to make sure that this guy was gone and when I turned back around he handed me a shot. I’m fairly certain that there was something in that drink. As a college student, I had been drunk before, and I had not drank nearly enough to become drunk and incompetent that night. I
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